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nissan gq
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Discussion Starter #1
In a fit of intimidation mode,there is now an apparent 80% tariff imposed on Australian Barley imported by a country which has signed a free trade agreement and has contracts for ongoing purchases. Aaand there is a problem with beef too,something about labelling ? maybe the ink isn't red enough ?
How many of us will impose a 100% no buy wherever possible on products imported from that country ? I have looked around a couple of retailers and the number of items imported,which we are fully capable of producing here is staggering,many obviously due to corporate greed for the cheaper production costs,but old Aussie brands either purchased or plagerised to grab your dollar.
A large percentage of these items are one use only,you only get what you pay for when it comes to tools,and short-life electrical items and who would buy their food,the health regs are sketchy at best,melamine in your dairy/chocolate anyone ? I found a Snickers bar recently labelled made in china,went in the bin !
There is obvious pride in their product when a brand of tyres has made in prc letters about 1MM HIGH,well we don't want to make it too easy--.
C'Mon people get the word out,be a discerning buyer and support our local and friendly producers,I don't respond well to intimidation,how about you ?

Cheers,G.
 

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I Have Imaginary Friends
Patrol Hybrid.
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I’ve checked a few things out, there is usually a label ‘made to xxxxxx specifications’. You get what you pay for. Sucks I know, but it’s what we have set ourselves up for.
 

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CRD Wagon
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I’ve checked a few things out, there is usually a label ‘made to xxxxxx specifications’. You get what you pay for. Sucks I know, but it’s what we have set ourselves up for.
I agree. We are reaping what we have sewn. Despite all the anti China sentiment I still see MIC product being bought and sold everywhere.
 

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nissan patrol
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In a fit of intimidation mode,there is now an apparent 80% tariff imposed on Australian Barley imported by a country which has signed a free trade agreement and has contracts for ongoing purchases. Aaand there is a problem with beef too,something about labelling ? maybe the ink isn't red enough ?
How many of us will impose a 100% no buy wherever possible on products imported from that country ? I have looked around a couple of retailers and the number of items imported,which we are fully capable of producing here is staggering,many obviously due to corporate greed for the cheaper production costs,but old Aussie brands either purchased or plagerised to grab your dollar.
A large percentage of these items are one use only,you only get what you pay for when it comes to tools,and short-life electrical items and who would buy their food,the health regs are sketchy at best,melamine in your dairy/chocolate anyone ? I found a Snickers bar recently labelled made in china,went in the bin !
There is obvious pride in their product when a brand of tyres has made in prc letters about 1MM HIGH,well we don't want to make it too easy--.
C'Mon people get the word out,be a discerning buyer and support our local and friendly producers,I don't respond well to intimidation,how about you ?

Cheers,G.
I wonder if that works both ways?

IE- 99 year lease on Darwin port torn up
 

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Nissan MK,GQ & now GU.
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Since the covid everybody has been sinking the boot into China. Too little too late.

All the shrills have been very loud over the latest beef ban. I only heard crickets when the same non compliance ban was introduced in 2017.

Granted this time the context is a little different.
 

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We;ve been buying Aussie for years.
It takes a while to read the labels in the supermarket, but if you keep at it you get used to what is Aussie and what is imported.
It does cost a bit more, but the quality is worth it.
If you are not able to find where a product is made, then it's not Aussie.
As far as appliances, clothes or house hold stuff goes, the only stuff you find is imported with Australian tags.

1- IF THE PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT ARE SERIOUS ABOUT REVIVING THE AUSTRALIAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY, WE NEED TO ABANDON FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS AND APPLY IMPORT DUTIES ON EVERYTHING THAT COMES INTO THE COUNTRY
2- IMPORT DUTIES MUST BE SPENT ON ESTABLISHING COMPETITIVE INDUSTRIES, NOT FATTENING POLITICIANS
3- OVERSEAS OWNED COMPANIES MUST BE PAY THE EQUIVALENT OF IMPORT DUTY ON ALL PROFITS LEAVING AUSTRALIA

519696
 

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nissan
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Yep hopefully these events spur a rise in australian manufacturing and Nationalism! I refuse to buy anything that i know is chinese.
 

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nissan
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As a country we have been pretty dumb politically for a long time. Back in the 50s & 60s when china first started looking at us we were selling the worlds best sheep Rams, we should have been selling socks Stop selling iron ore & sell steel we used to.
We were a manufacturing country now we are an importing country It would be nice to go back, and the old chestnut that labour costs are too high if its made here is bullshit if we are looking after our own interests first
my rant over
 

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CRD Wagon
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Since the covid everybody has been sinking the boot into China. Too little too late.

All the shrills have been very loud over the latest beef ban. I only heard crickets when the same non compliance ban was introduced in 2017.

Granted this time the context is a little different.
Spot on mate. Spot on.
 

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Nissan MK,GQ & now GU.
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Australia has 45,000 manufacturers. On average they employ 20 people. Imagine if we could double that? The biggest hurdles are home grown. Energy costs and lack of skilled employees is hampering expansion. Refunding TAFE would be a good start.

If we apply import tariffs on everything that comes into the country it would have a negative effect on our manufacturing industry. Many rely on imports for the raw ingredients. Carbon fiber is one example.

I know where my son is employed they rely heavily on imports and their Asian business suppliers. This relationship with their Asian suppliers has been built up over decades.
 

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GU1 and D21
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Agree with all posts here...I also only buy Aussie made in supermarkets and have done well before the current crisis. There is no reason to be importing basic foodstuiffs into this country... we are truly fortunate to be able to produce all our own food. Unless people start to support Australian manufacturing, I'm not sure how much longer we will have a choice. My 2c worth
 

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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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I got hold of a 38 page report, I cannot post it in its entirety but I can share this tiny snippet here:

  • Employing a new definition for “strategic dependency”, this report finds that the five powers are strategically dependent on China in 831 categories of goods. Australia is strategically dependent on China for 595 categories; Canada, 367; New Zealand, 513; the UK, 229; and the US, 414. Strategic dependency is identified when a country is a net importer of a particular good, it imports more than 50% of its supplies from China, and China controls more than 30% of the global market of that particular good.
  • Comparing these goods with the common understanding of critical national infrastructure among the five powers, the report finds that one or more of these powers is strategically dependent on China in 260 categories of goods that service critical applications. In Australia this applies to 167 categories; in Canada, 83; New Zealand, 144; the UK, 57; and the US, 114.
  • China, for example, is the world’s largest producer of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and each of the five powers is dependent on drugs that are either imported from China or include APIs imported from China. China also produces the bulk of the world’s health-related products, and three of the five powers are dependent on China for Vitamin C. The centralisation of these global supply chains makes them vulnerable to interruption, whether by mistake or design. The supply chains can also be weaponised.
  • Further, by looking ahead to the next-generation industries most crucial to the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”, the report finds that in 57 categories of goods at least one of the five powers is strategically dependent on China. Australia and New Zealand are each strategically dependent on China for 35 categories of goods; the US and Canada for 25; while the UK is strategically dependent on 12.
  • China produced 80% of global magnesium in 2018, and magnesium’s properties, as well as those of magnesium compounds, mean that it will be central to innovation in energy, transport, construction, computer and other next-generation industries. Because of this, Australia, the UK, and the US class magnesium as a critical material. Yet, four of the five powers are dependent on Chinese imports for their supplies. No new (as opposed to recycled or reclaimed) magnesium is made in western Europe, and there is only one company left in the US making new magnesium from local raw materials (as opposed to via recycling).
 

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If we apply import tariffs on everything that comes into the country it would have a negative effect on our manufacturing industry. Many rely on imports for the raw ingredients. Carbon fiber is one example.
Perhaps we need to be applying import tariffs only on completed goods, not on raw materials of parts that contribute to an Australian made or assembled product. Even a step like that would balance out the huge price difference in cheap and crappy import products. People might return to buying more locally made and support better quality products.
 

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The Googlest, Apparently!
nissan patrol
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I got hold of a 38 page report, I cannot post it in its entirety but I can share this tiny snippet here:

  • Employing a new definition for “strategic dependency”, this report finds that the five powers are strategically dependent on China in 831 categories of goods. Australia is strategically dependent on China for 595 categories; Canada, 367; New Zealand, 513; the UK, 229; and the US, 414. Strategic dependency is identified when a country is a net importer of a particular good, it imports more than 50% of its supplies from China, and China controls more than 30% of the global market of that particular good.
  • Comparing these goods with the common understanding of critical national infrastructure among the five powers, the report finds that one or more of these powers is strategically dependent on China in 260 categories of goods that service critical applications. In Australia this applies to 167 categories; in Canada, 83; New Zealand, 144; the UK, 57; and the US, 114.
  • China, for example, is the world’s largest producer of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and each of the five powers is dependent on drugs that are either imported from China or include APIs imported from China. China also produces the bulk of the world’s health-related products, and three of the five powers are dependent on China for Vitamin C. The centralisation of these global supply chains makes them vulnerable to interruption, whether by mistake or design. The supply chains can also be weaponised.
  • Further, by looking ahead to the next-generation industries most crucial to the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”, the report finds that in 57 categories of goods at least one of the five powers is strategically dependent on China. Australia and New Zealand are each strategically dependent on China for 35 categories of goods; the US and Canada for 25; while the UK is strategically dependent on 12.
  • China produced 80% of global magnesium in 2018, and magnesium’s properties, as well as those of magnesium compounds, mean that it will be central to innovation in energy, transport, construction, computer and other next-generation industries. Because of this, Australia, the UK, and the US class magnesium as a critical material. Yet, four of the five powers are dependent on Chinese imports for their supplies. No new (as opposed to recycled or reclaimed) magnesium is made in western Europe, and there is only one company left in the US making new magnesium from local raw materials (as opposed to via recycling).
Perhaps instead of producing papers on how we are dependant on China they should be putting out papers on how we curtail that dependency.

Vit C, do you know how much food containing ascorbic acid we throw away each year? $13,000,000,000 worth. 13 billion, think about it. All because Woolies or Coles says it is not pretty enough so the customers wont buy it.

And Australia produces 90% of it's on Magnesium, the 10% we don't produce comes in already made products we import (alloys etc).

CSIRO develop low cost magnesium - Australian Mining

And we have Energy Minister Taylor saying he wants Australia to use the plummeting price of gas to support fast start gas plants to get more renewable energy into the grid and deliver cheaper power to manufacturers.

Wants? Wants!! It should be mandated. The time is now to reshape manufacturing in Aust, the covid issue is the perfect catalyst to do major reform and Scomo has the political popularity, and now the backing of most Australians because of China's BS to get it all going.

But someone will be along soon to say, it's too hard, or we should not antagonise the Chinese.

Getting sick of all the BS about how we cant do stuff, or we should not offend someone.

But like the Melb / Syd fast rail link that you put in the too hard basket.

Most would not last a day on an oil rig where the credo is, "if you can't do it you can't stay" because we find ways of getting shyte done ...

If we rang the rig manager in town and said it's too hard, or people are complaining because they are going to miss out on smoko, or the mechanic said no as the new pipework would use up some of his workshop space we would be fired on the spot.
 

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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Perhaps instead of producing papers on how we are dependant on China they should be putting out papers on how we curtail that dependency.
That is exctly what the rest of the 38 page doc does, as I said the post was only a snippet of leading observations, what it did was outline how dependant 5 countries are on China for those that may not have been aware. I'm not posting the entire doc here for a few reasons, one reason being I'm not sure I am supposed to have it.
I'm quite sure this report has been distributed among our polies, it has some big international political contributors.
 

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Vit C, do you know how much food containing ascorbic acid we throw away each year? $13,000,000,000 worth. 13 billion, think about it. All because Woolies or Coles says it is not pretty enough so the customers wont buy it.
I'd always heard about this but never really thought too much about it until I saw it first hand. One of my previous jobs had me maintaining some food processing/packaging equipment west of Brissy around Grafton/Gatton and the amount of produce that went in the skip bins due to not meeting the requirements of the supermarkets for either being slightly odd shaped, not big enough or discoloured was mind blowing.
 

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nissan gq
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Discussion Starter #19
Of course it's a strategic asset,blind freddy should realise that,but the dick who signed the lease was obviously dazzled by the dollars-- maybe there is cause for the AFP to investigate the personal finances of those involved.
The residents of the socialist managed states should monitor their government's contractual engagement with overseas interests to ensure this trend stops.In W.A. the former premier was airing the idea of leasing Fremantle to the chinese, Pharq total idiocy,I wrote a response to the then accessible Perth Now objecting to the idea and asked "how close to treason is this ? " obviously no response, but soon after the feed-back option disappeared.The same peanut announced they were proposing W.A.'s first steel mill in association with Sino Iron-- there had been Australian Iron and Steel producing at Kwinana for decades prior to closure in the 70's i think.So I asked how it was possible I had some steel roll impressed AIS Kwinana --- no response .
Obviously there is a glaring gap in government oversight for "don't take chit"guys like DB101 ,Plumma,geeyutoo and a few others,
Start emailing your govt reps,express your concerns and suggestions for action and let them know we are watching and interested it progress toward reestablishing self reliance and resource self sustainability.

Cheers,G.
 

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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Yes that clause does appear to exist, I remember this being discussed when that whole sorry episode came out, NT Govt should never have leased that and placed us in a dodgy position, they got a measly $500 odd million.

I'm not sure now would be the time to enact any such clause even if we could, everything is still in the diplomatic stage, a war of words, as we have seen many times China flex's its muscles every few years, this time we are not alone.
 
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