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Discussion Starter #41
Late response to this thread I guess. A lot of burning does take place quite close to town. Yes, sooking about smoke, ash and smell occasionally occurs. I've been lucky enough to be involved with a couple of burnoffs on properties now. It gives you huge respect for fire.

The breaks that are required to law up here now look too small to me... apparently they are more lax in NSW and VIC????

I saw a post on social media from one of our members saying "dont blame the greenies, blame people who build too close to the bush and not enough resources for the firefighters"

I personally think people should be able to live in the bush but we need to be realistic about fire beaks, firefighting equipment and fuel management. The firefighters already have their hands full so I agree more needs to be done. Here the onus is on the landowner to some extent. I see the same people not looking after their stuff year on year, ignoring recommendations from the local firies.

When it inevitably catches fire each year the firies still give up their time and risk themselves to put it out. Even when the same ignoramus builds walls out of old tyres and doesnt even have a jinker trailer or do any slashing...
Couldn't agree more, I said something earlier very similar, driving around this wide country I often see homes that you know will go off in a close bushfire, there is one memorable one around here that is under gum trees and the gutters are backed up over the roof for several metres with dead leaves, a disaster waiting to happen, not an uncommon site out on the road.
 

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Late response to this thread I guess. A lot of burning does take place quite close to town. Yes, sooking about smoke, ash and smell occasionally occurs. I've been lucky enough to be involved with a couple of burnoffs on properties now. It gives you huge respect for fire.

The breaks that are required to law up here now look too small to me... apparently they are more lax in NSW and VIC????

I saw a post on social media from one of our members saying "dont blame the greenies, blame people who build too close to the bush and not enough resources for the firefighters"

I personally think people should be able to live in the bush but we need to be realistic about fire beaks, firefighting equipment and fuel management. The firefighters already have their hands full so I agree more needs to be done. Here the onus is on the landowner to some extent. I see the same people not looking after their stuff year on year, ignoring recommendations from the local firies.

When it inevitably catches fire each year the firies still give up their time and risk themselves to put it out. Even when the same ignoramus builds walls out of old tyres and doesnt even have a jinker trailer or do any slashing...
People not respecting the environments they live in is a big issue in Victoria. And mates are dealing with it in NSW as well.

The Kinglake area is a prime example. Less than 3 yrs after black Saturday. The build up of growth on people’s property’s was unbelievable.

Now just years 10yrs later. The fire danger again is massive. And it’s the same morons that probably didn’t bother with home insurance last time.

If I lived in any of those areas (which I would love to). I would have a dedicated water storage. That was primarily there for property defence. With a fixed sprinkler system on all buildings.


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Couldn't agree more, I said something earlier very similar, driving around this wide country I often see homes that you know will go off in a close bushfire, there is one memorable one around here that is under gum trees and the gutters are backed up over the roof for several metres with dead leaves, a disaster waiting to happen, not an uncommon site out on the road.
And they will be the first ones to cry and scream why wasn’t a strike team of trucks there to protect their house.


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And they will be the first ones to cry and scream why wasn’t a strike team of trucks there to protect their house.


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If their homes are not defend-able the rural fire brigade will not go in there.

It is still possible to build in bush fire prone areas (you will need a big budget). For eg you must have passing lanes on your drive so RFS can get in and you can get out. Turn area at the end of the drive for RFS trucks. Concrete tank that must be full at all times with cam lock fitting at the bottom for RFS to connect to. Fire fighting pump connected to that tank at all times. This is just a few of many rules before you even get to the building side of things.

I will stick with my place which is classed as managed farm land and has been classed as defend-able by the RFS. Still could burn though.
 

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It is still possible to build in bush fire prone areas (you will need a big budget). For eg you must have passing lanes on your drive so RFS can get in and you can get out. Turn area at the end of the drive for RFS trucks. Concrete tank that must be full at all times with cam lock fitting at the bottom for RFS to connect to. Fire fighting pump connected to that tank at all times. This is just a few of many rules before you even get to the building side of things.
This brings to memory a sign that I saw on an article filmed from an RFS truck the day after the Marysville fire. The truck was going door to door after the fire checking on people and houses. Most of the houses had been evacuated but there was no indication of this from the road and the fireies had to walk down what were at times pretty long driveways not knowing what they would find at the end. Sometimes it was a house still standing that might or might not be occupied but sometimes it was a pile of charred ruins which still had to be checked for bodies. They drove along a section of road that had an expensive looking fence made from stone pitched columns and wrought iron panels with big double gates and hung on the gates with a wire tie was a commercially sign-written sign that was obviously made well before the fire that said something like "This house has been evacuated. We consider it undefendable in case of bush fire." The fireman that was doing most of the talking for the camera said he wished everyone had been so prepared, even if it was being prepared to lose their house. The driveway disappeared off between the charred trees and we never got to see what was at the end of it but the RFS guys were happy that it was one less driveway they had to walk down to check.
 

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50m clear around buildings.
Clean gutters filled with water to quench embers.
Fire resistant Shutters on windows
Stored water Sprayer system and independent pump
Regular burn offs to reduce fuel loads.

Prevention or reduction is your only defense. Otherwise when the fire hits you're screwed.
If it's a crown fire - get out unless you've built a sealed insulated underground bunker.
 

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We generally get 2 or 3 bushfires a year in the bush that my property backs onto. EVERY single one has been caused by fire bugs. Usually kids.
Unfortunately it's my experience that the Dept of natural resources and local council do sweet fa in regards to managing fuel load. Their entire strategy revolves around paying a mowing contractor to mow a 10m wide strip behind my house. Past that point is untouched virgin bush. I end up mowing this break myself half the time due to the spratic scheduling of such works. Have seen the grass 2' high on occasions further up and down the "firebreak". There has never been a fuel reduction burn in the 25+ years I've lived here. Furthermore anyone with half a brain would realize that a 10m firebreak will do sweet fa if the bush closest to us goes up whilst our normal afternoon seabrease is blowing. My house is 21m from the back fence so its 31m in total.
I was banned by the council at one stage from mowing behind my place. This came out in a newspaper interview I gave whilst hosing down a fire with a firehose hooked up and left with me by the firies in order for them to concentrate their efforts deeper into the bush. I call a spade a spade so I didn't hold back in describing how stupid it was for me not to be allowed to manage the overgrown break when they were too lazy to do it. It's only a small firebreak but it's all we have. Was pleased the next day when the state member turned up at my place. He ended up telling me to stuff the council and protect my property by mowing and clearing debris when I saw fit. The state gov would back me if the council was stupid enough to take action against me. I now mow the break behind my place and both next door neibours every time I mow my back yard. As well as mowing a 2-3m wide 40 odd meter track that joins the main fire trail. Having a large mower with a 22" blade and big motor makes this reasonably easy.

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