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I have been running a pump with the same modification for two years now without any problems. I can’t see the need to balance some thing so small in diameter that only does around 3-4000 rpm most of the time. The extra weight added to the impeller is negligible.
 

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I have been running a pump with the same modification for two years now without any problems. I can’t see the need to balance some thing so small in diameter that only does around 3-4000 rpm most of the time. The extra weight added to the impeller is negligible.

It's not about the weight so much but the balance. In our early pumps we didn't balance/true the pump and found very early bearing failure.
Some failed in 10,000 kms.
 

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It's not about the weight so much but the balance. In our early pumps we didn't balance/true the pump and found very early bearing failure.
Some failed in 10,000 kms.
I’ve probably done 18-20,000 k’s with this pump, still going no noises or leaks! I’m sure the unbalanced pulley, fan clutch and fan have more effect on bearing life than the impeller!!!
 

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I’ve probably done 18-20,000 k’s with this pump, still going no noises or leaks! I’m sure the unbalanced pulley, fan clutch and fan have more effect on bearing life than the impeller!!!

Probably should clarify it's the placement of the cover and if it's centralised to the eye of the pump, within say 20 thou.
 

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GQ Dual Cab. TD42Ti with fruit.
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I would have thought that the effects of cavitation, and the varying loads created by speeding up and slowing down of the impellor would create more bearing load than a small imbalance, which has damping effect from the water.
 

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I would have thought that the effects of cavitation, and the varying loads created by speeding up and slowing down of the impellor would create more bearing load than a small imbalance, which has damping effect from the water.
My original thoughts were that a clutch fan assembly hanging of the nose of the pump would be more detrimental, but has proven not be hence we go to great levels to make sure the pump rotating assembly spins true.
 

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GQ Dual Cab. TD42Ti with fruit.
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My original thoughts were that a clutch fan assembly hanging of the nose of the pump would be more detrimental, but has proven not be hence we go to great levels to make sure the pump rotating assembly spins true.
As you can see, my impellor was made in two pieces, to allow me to get it as accurate as possible. I figured I would not be able to do this by making it in one piece. So the base plate was made and attached, and then the flange set up so it was central to the shaft. I did this to make it as balanced as possible, and also to allow true running against the timing case.

So how has yours been made, and how is it attached???? No doubt the different methods will give different results.

And also, how have you balanced it? By measurement and setting clearances, or have you removed the impellor from the housing and spun it on a balancer?
 

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GQ Dual Cab. TD42Ti with fruit.
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I have tested my vehicle after changing the water pump, but only briefly. No noises or vibrations evident. Ditched the coolant and was running a cooling system cleaner in straight water. Temps seemed ok on the short drive. I did notice on a downhill run it went back down to 80, which it normally never does, so perhaps the thermostat will need a tweak to its height. Time will tell.
 

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Thought I should add to this as I just noticed it's a thing.

Our Y61 farm ute is 20 years old this year and has done only 76,000 km. It was my parent's farm ute from brand new before it came to us a couple of years ago.

Apart from the bullbar, spotties and winch and new suspension that I fitted... it's a stock leafie. Cooling system is unmolested.

Only now, in the warmth of the afternoon, do I notice the cooling issue. And that's only when I'm doing the water run - tray is a steel tipper and there'd be around 800 litres in the IBC.

The 10 km run along the road back from the spring climbs about 120 metres over the last two kilometres.

In the cool of the morning, I can top the hill fully loaded doing 80 with much of the rest of the trip at 90-100. But in the arvo at the moment with 35 degree plus days, trying this sees the gauge turn rapidly clockwise. Recovery is quick though - only takes the 1.5 km down grade to our road to sort it out

Coming up the hill earlier this arvo averaging 70 down to 50 saw the gauge sit nice and steady despite the ambient outside being 37 degrees and being fully loaded. This was the fourth run of the day - the first two it was cooler outside but I cooked it on the third run!!

Despite intially thinking there was a problem now I'm not so sure having read a bit of this thread.

Perhaps too many owners are simply asking or expecting too much from their vehicles. Especially with modern expectations. The base design of these things dates from anything up to four decades ago after all.

Perhaps, Nissan simply didn't design them to do heaving towing or loads whilst cruising at 100km/h plus in the middle of summer (and from my experience with the straight six diesel Toyota 75 series vehicles suggests that Toyota didn't either back then and things are still interesting at the margins for the V8 diesel versions too).
 

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Thought I should add to this as I just noticed it's a thing.

Our Y61 farm ute is 20 years old this year and has done only 76,000 km. It was my parent's farm ute from brand new before it came to us a couple of years ago.

Apart from the bullbar, spotties and winch and new suspension that I fitted... it's a stock leafie. Cooling system is unmolested.

Only now, in the warmth of the afternoon, do I notice the cooling issue. And that's only when I'm doing the water run - tray is a steel tipper and there'd be around 800 litres in the IBC.

The 10 km run along the road back from the spring climbs about 120 metres over the last two kilometres.

In the cool of the morning, I can top the hill fully loaded doing 80 with much of the rest of the trip at 90-100. But in the arvo at the moment with 35 degree plus days, trying this sees the gauge turn rapidly clockwise. Recovery is quick though - only takes the 1.5 km down grade to our road to sort it out

Coming up the hill earlier this arvo averaging 70 down to 50 saw the gauge sit nice and steady despite the ambient outside being 37 degrees and being fully loaded. This was the fourth run of the day - the first two it was cooler outside but I cooked it on the third run!!

Despite intially thinking there was a problem now I'm not so sure having read a bit of this thread.

Perhaps too many owners are simply asking or expecting too much from their vehicles. Especially with modern expectations. The base design of these things dates from anything up to four decades ago after all.

Perhaps, Nissan simply didn't design them to do heaving towing or loads whilst cruising at 100km/h plus in the middle of summer (and from my experience with the straight six diesel Toyota 75 series vehicles suggests that Toyota didn't either back then and things are still interesting at the margins for the V8 diesel versions too).
Well said , makes perfect sense
 

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Perhaps, Nissan simply didn't design them to do heaving towing or loads whilst cruising at 100km/h plus in the middle of summer (and from my experience with the straight six diesel Toyota 75 series vehicles suggests that Toyota didn't either back then and things are still interesting at the margins for the V8 diesel versions too).
I think the issue is that the TD was designed as an N/A engine. These don't generate enough power to overload the cooling system. Put a turbo on it and increase the fuel and you are pumping more heat into the cooling system than it was originally designed to handle.
 

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TD42 GQ
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I think the issue is that the TD was designed as an N/A engine. These don't generate enough power to overload the cooling system. Put a turbo on it and increase the fuel and you are pumping more heat into the cooling system than it was originally designed to handle.
I'd agree with that. My TD ran cool enough with a modest turbo until I fitted an 11mm pump. Now it has a lot more power but there's a tendency to run hot.
In my experience every little thing, including fuel metering and timing becomes important as we ask for more power from the TD.
 

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Why do some with stock systems and heaps of power never move and others that arnt modified hit 100+ but?

Mine is only 140hp but egts get high but towing a car from bundaberg to nsw Mid north coast it just hit 90. Towing at 100-110 aswell

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