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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The @#$£&** crossmember bolts! Thought I'd replace the gearbox mounts as they are a bit worn. The first bolt came out no worries, the second one snapped off, the third one broke off the captive nut inside the chassis!!! I left the rest for now.

Any ideas on the best way of getting the nut out of the chassis?
 

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Dafuc! Thats just bad luck there. The bolts have probably rusted inside. You may be able to cut the bolt and then shuffle the bit inside along the chassis rail till you get to a big enough hole to pull it out. The other will probably need heat and easyouts.
 

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The only thing I don't like after owning a cruiser is you can't open stubbies on the inside door latch
But you can on the lip of the bullbar:D

Came close to doing the same removing my cross member, trick is to be prepared for worst at the beginning, smack head of bolt a couple of times with hammer spray with plenty of CRC inside chassis at thread, small amount of heat from heat gun helps to, then gently try and undo with a socket work back and forth if any sign of difficulty.

Unfortunately Sparks this doesn't help you, cut and drill out old bolts and then make a plate either thread holes in it or weld nuts to it insert in chassis, to hold in place in chassis you could drill hole between bolt holes and plug weld from below, hope that makes sense

Ohh yeah don't forget the never seize!
 

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I know the pain.
Had to drill mine out. Run a tap to clean the threads. Or use a hacksaw or cut of disc and place a slot in a bolt to help clean the existing threads out.
Lots of anti seize and use a torque wrench.
Still need to helicoil one if the threads on mine.
8.8 bolts are working for me but 10.9 or higher will be much better.
Most bolt tensions on the web are dry torque settings.
Maybe about 80-85% of those numbers with anti seize as it's acts as a lubricant.
As for drilling the existing bolt have fun as it's a s##ty job. Make sure it doesn't damage the female thread as much as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yep I've bought a can of every release agent I can find to do the rest. Going to get the broken nut out and assess the best way to fix. Possibly use a nutsert as the remaining bolts are fine.
 

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Yep I've bought a can of every release agent I can find to do the rest. Going to get the broken nut out and assess the best way to fix. Possibly use a nutsert as the remaining bolts are fine.
I was talking to a mate a few weeks ago who had stripped the thread in a few of the nuts so went and bought bigger 14mm bolts and a thread tap. Tapped them out to 14mm metric fine pitch 1.25 I think it was. But that won't help a snapped off bolt or torn out nut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Got the rest of the bolts off sweet as with some freeze and release.

Had an idea about the broken one. What if I welded a bolt in place of the captive nut I broke so I could simply screw a nut on the end and retain 8 holding points? There's no way I can weld a nut inside the rail but I could easily weld a bolt in its place from the outside. Good idea or bad?
 

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Got the rest of the bolts off sweet as with some freeze and release.

Had an idea about the broken one. What if I welded a bolt in place of the captive nut I broke so I could simply screw a nut on the end and retain 8 holding points? There's no way I can weld a nut inside the rail but I could easily weld a bolt in its place from the outside. Good idea or bad?
Bad.

You'd have a thread hanging down that would be very easily damaged, then you'd really struggle to get the nut off in future. Go with madkiwi's suggestion above, perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Leethal, the difficulty I have with madk1w1's suggestion is that I do not think there is any way to get a plate inside the chassis rail at the right location. I would have to insert the plate in the front of the car, and somehow move it to the point above the crossmember. And this method also relies on assuming that the chassis is actually flat inside, chances are there will be part of the weld from the nut I broke off stopping the plate from sitting flat.

I agree that having a thread hanging down isn't ideal if it's too long, but if it was cut to be just long enough to get the washer, spring washer and nut on then I think the risk of it being damaged is minimal. Plus doing this eliminates the possibility of it ever breaking again, as the thread is all outside the chassis where it can't hold water in it and rust. Not trying to argue with you, just discussing the pros and cons of each method.
 

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Hey mate, yeah you can do what you're saying, but the best way is what I think Madkiwi is saying, and that is:, cut out a square hole around the broken captive nut about 50mm square, then cut a piece of plate as a patch to fill that hole (just like you would cut a patch for rust repairs). In that patch you will drill a hole and weld on a captive nut, then weld the patch into the chassis.

I hope that makes sense mate, it can be hard to put this type of explanation into words sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Question for those suggesting the plate, tap etc option. Doesn't this leave the situation with the same design flaw as it had originally? The bolt is still going to be inside the rail where mud and crap will just rust it out again! And I know the previous owner was religious about cleaning out the rails and it still rusted out.
 

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The other thing to use for future reference is a can of the freeze stuff. Quickly freezers bolts to crack the rust holding to the nut thread.
 
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