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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Neat set up bud, which one of those would you uses when you want to join the end of a wire to the middle of an existing wire.that’s what’s happ
I have crimp connectors that are bigger one end than the other so one wire in one end and two wires out the other, there is a good array of connectors available. Have added a lot of electrics over the years, only Issue I had was with day lights I fitted and used one of those crap things to pick up power many years ago, never again.

Depending where the wires are I also use heat shrink.
 

· I Have Imaginary Friends
Patrol Hybrid.
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I’ve done it that way, but on a bench, it’s not easy and not worth the trouble. 😉 I did it for a wire that had a bit of tension on it. Now I’d just put a knot in it. Getting ready for incoming from the sparkies. 🤣
 

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2010 GU VI WGN AUTO
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153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I have crimp connectors that are bigger one end than the other so one wire in one end and two wires out the other, there is a good array of connectors available. Have added a lot of electrics over the years, only Issue I had was with day lights I fitted and used one of those crap things to pick up power many years ago, never again.

Depending where the wires are I also use heat shrink.
yea that makes sense thank you. that used to be my way any thing electrical I’d just drop it off.
 

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nissan
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33 Posts
I've just had to replace the globe holders in the GU as they weren't holding the connection anymore. The holder loom can be removed from the light housing and disconnected at the other end to completely remove from the vehicle for working on. (Garry from Nizzbits to the rescue)
I solder joined the extra loom into this on the bench with crimp connectors on the other end to join into the bar lights. I also solder the wire into the crimp as well cos I'm paranoid. Always use heat shrink on electrical work but especially in this area cos it cops all the road moisture and rubbish thrown up, let alone off-road mud etc.
Now I can still disconnect the loom from all lights as needed but am confident that the joins are solid.
If you are going to do this type of work a good crimper and quality crimps are worth their weight. I also have a butane powered soldering iron I carry when traveling as well as the multi-meter.
 

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2010 GU VI WGN AUTO
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Wow you are prepared af, I have soldering iron at home. I plan to get the crimps soon ish. I pushed the wire back into the dodgy connection and the Parker’s are working.

I guess I have a electrical short some where I’ll sort out soon. I’ll replace all those connections one day because the indicators stopped working on front bar and the Parker flashes with indicator lol but I’ll sus it when weather improves
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Wow you are prepared af, I have soldering iron at home. I plan to get the crimps soon ish. I pushed the wire back into the dodgy connection and the Parker’s are working.

I guess I have a electrical short some where I’ll sort out soon. I’ll replace all those connections one day because the indicators stopped working on front bar and the Parker flashes with indicator lol but I’ll sus it when weather improves
Soldering connections comes with its own issues, I was a dedicated solderer for many years until becoming the owner of various boats and doing mods and also talking to various people and hearing their issues, one of those is a member here ( @OldMav ) and at the time was a boat builder. Crimping with quality tools gives the best overall results, I also coat the parts with dielectric grease before crimping ensuring good contact. Using heat shrink is always a good idea for ongoing strenghtening and protection of the wires at the crimp zone.
My 2 cents worth.
 

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'14 Y61 ZD30 CRD M/T ST
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At the risk of turning this into another crimp vs solder thread, I agree with @geeyoutoo. Nowadays I only use soldering where absolutely necessary and where no other option exists.

Making good crimp connections take some practise and require the right tools, but well worth the investment in time and money IMO.

Once you get the hang of crimping you’d wonder how you went without it for so many years.

One piece of advice though… I frustrated myself endlessly at the start with elcheapo crimpers because I was a tightarse. Spend the $50 and get a decent quality crimping tool with interchangeable dies. Mine is over 20 years old now and paid for itself probably within the first 6 months.
 

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Solder all the way. Quik easy n simple to do, if done correctly. After 10+ yrs in the 4wd industry and 47+ yrs of life. Its the best way to join wires together. Ive seen solder joints survive 20+ yrs in old mq's
but crimps failing after 1yr. Again its all in how u do it and quality of the equipment u choose to use.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Solder all the way. Quik easy n simple to do, if done correctly. After 10+ yrs in the 4wd industry and 47+ yrs of life. Its the best way to join wires together. Ive seen solder joints survive 20+ yrs in old mq's
but crimps failing after 1yr. Again its all in how u do it and quality of the equipment u choose to use.
Never had a quality crimp fail, but have had 'dry' joints in solders over the years.
I'm a 76 year old fitter machinist/engineer 😉.
 

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'14 Y61 ZD30 CRD M/T ST
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Solder all the way. Quik easy n simple to do, if done correctly. After 10+ yrs in the 4wd industry and 47+ yrs of life. Its the best way to join wires together. Ive seen solder joints survive 20+ yrs in old mq's
but crimps failing after 1yr. Again its all in how u do it and quality of the equipment u choose to use.
Can’t see how a crimp join can fail after a period of time. It’ll either fail almost immediately if not done correctly, or last as long as the rest of the wiring harness. Unlike solder which introduces heat changes the stiffness of the harness material, a crimp can’t induce fatigue.

Pretty much all the solder joints I’ve seen fail, do so due to vibration or excessive cyclic bending. I can’t recall a single one of my (correctly done) crimp joins fail… Ever… And I’m not a sparky.

I should add that most of my experience with crimped joints actually stem from me building my own harnesses using proper automotive connectors, which all require crimping multiple connector pins onto the wires. Crimping two or three wires together is pretty much the same thing, be it a little more fiddly.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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There are many reasons why a dry solder joint can happen and yes doing it incorrectly is a contributing factor, incorrect iron temperature, holding the iron on a new joint for to long burning away all flux, but mechanical actions can also contribute, fatigue from cyclic loading, vibration, corrosion, etc.

Another factor we need to consider is the experience of our members attempting these jobs, this is the reason I recommend members buy quality crimps and crimpers, much easier in many ways, including mobility and preparation.

I have built many electronic devices for my and other members patrols but they all finish up being connected inline through crimps.
 

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Dry solder joint, means not done correctly.
Doesn't matter what the job is, it can be done poorly. The right tools and skills go a long way. I would also go as far as saying a poor solder joint will probably be better than a poor crimp joint and a good solder joint with appropriate strain relief will most likely last until its someone else's problem for our typical application in a 4wd.

However, if you want to look at 'best practice' then the place where money isn't an issue and it's all about reliability then see what goes on in a motor sport wiring harness.
You will also find the same butt splices in a factory wiring harness.
It isn't hard to achieve a good crimp but a little trial and error is required to get a feel for what makes a good crimp.
I would hazard a guess that the most common 4wd diy mod will be some sort of 12v accessory so setting your self up with a decent set of crimpers and some butt splices is a great idea.
 
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