Patrol 4x4 - Nissan Patrol Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
nissan
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Rogue
nissan gu patrol
Joined
·
20,220 Posts
Its a load of horse crap. Car's even in the outback do more kms per breakdown than their older counterparts. I've not heard of someone having an ECU fault outback, but have heard of sensor faults.

The worst thing about modern cars is the reduction of overengineering the chassis and body. Too many people load up to or over the GVW and that is were I believe there is more issues than any electrical issue.
 

·
Glasshouse Bogan #1
nissan patrol gu
Joined
·
9,423 Posts
I'm not even going to read the article off course an old diesel with a mechanical pump is going to be more reliable there's so much less to fail.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
nissan
Joined
·
21,635 Posts
I agree with him. Give me an old GQ any day. Over-engineered and over-built but very simple to fix.

There are more than a few drivers out there who are actually dumber than the vehicle they are driving.
 

·
Rogue
nissan gu patrol
Joined
·
20,220 Posts
Commonrail is the worst thing to come to touring vehicles in Aus
 

·
Rogue
nissan gu patrol
Joined
·
20,220 Posts
True, more parts and all = more opportunities to fail. But work quality exceeds that of yesteryears cars and they're all round more reliable. If you want to look at individual processes/systems in a car, that is a different thing.
 

·
Premium Member
2003 ZD30 Di Patrol (The rare Gold one)
Joined
·
25,671 Posts
I've had a mechanical diesel leave me stranded 1000km from home. My zd30 has never let me down.
 

·
Glasshouse Bogan #1
nissan patrol gu
Joined
·
9,423 Posts
Go to PNG and buy 1000 new td42 GU's and buy 1000 new common rail patrols and run them for 20 years and see what happens. plain obvious to me.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
nissan
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Sorry, I wasn't intent on starting an old vs new war. My point was more around the fact that modern cars are much harder to troubleshoot than older ones and that I tended to agree with the gist of the article that this could be problematic on remote travel. Whether or not newer cars are less/more likely to have an issue is a whole different ballgame and probably hard to prove either way I'd have thought.

The article seemed pertinent as a little while back I had an issue with my D40 where, one day out of the blue, it failed to drive...it'd start, but any load caused it to stall. I did some basic diagnosis and, having run out of options, had it towed to Nissan. It took the them three days to diagnose the problem, which turned out to be an issue with the ECU.
For me....that was the moment I realized modern 4WD's aren't for me and that I wanted to go back to where I'd come from; the old school (hence the GU with mechanical injection, etc). It's not a slate on the folk with modern 4WD's, just personal preference. I'm handy enough with a spanner and I'd like some chance of fixing my truck when it breaks. :)
 

·
Registered
nissan
Joined
·
21,635 Posts
When I was a young fella I had a Morris Minor for seven years. I could fix anything that went wrong (but always carried a spare petrol pump b'cos it was prone to crapping out frequently, SU Fuel Rejection System.) It even had a crank handle and if the battery was down it'd get you started. Access to the engine bay was easy and valve grinds and tappets were a piece of cake. I loved the simplicity. My GQ is pretty similar and I understand it. I have a new Mazda 6 and looking under the bonnet scares me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,843 Posts
Who'd have thought a can of electrical contact cleaner would become a fundamental part of a break down kit ?

And the old idea of building a fire and making a pot of tea as the first step in a break down / recovery scenario might still have some merit. Only these days you disconnect all the batteries for half an hour , make a brew then have a go at getting underway again. I have no idea whether that would or could work in a break down scenario but I'd try it in desperation.

I do like my patrol though. I manually change gears, I manually select 4wd/2wd, I manually engage the front hubs. In my car I even manually wind the windows up and down. And that's the way I like it.

Being a 2005, the last of the DI motors I hope I got the best and most reliable DI motor. I think I'd be screwed if it stopped though!
 

·
Every dog has his day
2005 TD42 GUIV
Joined
·
18,471 Posts
My daily driver sedan is a 2012 and run by more computers than you can poke a stick at.

The patrol I drive into the middle of nowhere and trust to get me home is of 1992 vintage. With power to only one wire, fuel shut off solenoid, it will run. With a few spare fuel filters always on board, it should have clean enough fuel to run.

The transfer is engaged with a stick, not a button powering solenoids.

The hubs are engaged by manually turning a dial.

The diffs and gearbox are over engineered, not 'just big enough to do the job'.

If it stops, I have a very good chance of fixing it. It has never failed to get me home yet.

If a newer computer run car stopped, I'm not sure I could figure out its problem, let alone fix it, and how much coin for a huge swag of spare sensors and the like anyway?

Take the 200 series. That Glen bloke from Roo Systems had an alt crap out on a DVD, had to be towed back to a Cairns IIRC. Also on All4Adventure, the 200 crapped an alt. Had to run a genny on the roofrack to get him to Katherine. Brand new cars... All seems a bit too delicate for my liking. GQ = 20 mins to fit spare alt on side of track!

I'll stick with the old girl for a while yet I think...
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top