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With the current Ukraine situation, where are the hands on the doomsday clock situated?

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Hard line old time KGB style propaganda,the people are deprived of outside news and information.I've watched some street interviews from Russia and the people are either convinced of the special military operation,or very guarded in their response,so either way there is little or no dissent,especialy if the reward can be 15 yrs in a gulag -- or a Makarov to the back of the skull.
Russia has a special victory over germany parade every May,and he needs a victory in Ukraine to show the people which makes me think he might resort to a nuclear strike to achieve it.He has no regard for the welfare of his troops,civilians or much else so I think it will be a trivial decision.
Absolutely I know that, but, as I've said before there are Russians who are in a position to know the truth, many of those are in a position of influence, these are the ones I refer to. Citizens in the street have no idea, everything is blocked for them.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Probably a case of, "He that rocks the boat, goes to Siberia. And so does his family. If he's lucky."
No balls, no principles, surely there are at least a few who care for where this could lead if putin is not stopped.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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Maybe they are blinded by his BS and rhetoric,he has been in an unassailable position for 20 + years,habit forming,that is probably affecting his view of getting an arse kicking in Ukraine.
There were even attempts on Hitler's life by some of his ranking personnel, unsuccessful but at least they tried.
 

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I watched an interview a few days ago with someone that used to be close to Putin. He said everyone close enough to Putin to oust him has everything they say & do monitored by Putin's cronies, so there's very little chance of anyone getting together to get rid of him.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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I'm going to keep an optimistic view, putin is assassinated or gets talked down. This latest general he has appointed to lead the invasion has the potential to escalate this dramatically, I heard numbers in the vicinity of 19,000 Russian dead, of course confirmation is impossible but it is a possibility and the news could get back to russia.
 

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nissan gq
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I am not a qualified historian,political analyst or doctor of anything,but have read volumes of history over past decades.If we don't learn from history,we will keep making historical mistakes.
I try to weigh all the information I can find,discard that I assess as BS,propaganda and party lines,look at the situation openly and try to make sense of what is remaining.
Pessimism.optimism and realism are the choices we have, I am optimistic there will be a positive outcome,realistic enough to see Russia's actions are barbaric and pessimistic regarding the tactics they will use trying to achieve their goals.
 

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nissan
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After the dramatic lack of response from both Ukraine and the rest of the world after Russian tanks rolled into Crimea and took control in 2014, I guess Putin expected more of the same with the rest of Ukraine. Sure, during the annexing of Crimea there was outrage from the Ukrainian government but they never tried to mount a serious defence, and there were sanctions from the many western countries but they were really only political statememnts rather than serious economic sanctions with bite. The fact that Crimea was historically Russian territory and most of the population were of ethnic Russian heritage had a lot to do with the responses.

Russia has always been like cousins to the Ukraine and that is how the two populations felt about each other but that all changed when Russia took Crimea back. Ukraine felt badly treated by Russia and were almost embarrassed at their own inability to keep Russia out. Not just the government but the people in the streets of Ukraine prepared themselves for a solid defence vowing that what happened in Crimea would not happen again.

Putin completely misjuged the situation, as did most of the world. I would be interested to know what would have happened in the latest invasion if the Crimean invasion in 2014 had not happened, because my understanding is that the view of Ukrainians towards Russia completely changed as a result.

Things are continuing to go from bad to worse for Putin. Now both Finland and Sweden are looking at joining Nato so that they have some protection from their beligerant neighbour.

 

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It's going to be interesting to see how the Victory Day parades go. I was in St Petersburg for one and it was an extravaganza of military chest-thumping and showing off. Might be a few vehicles and divisions down on previous ones. I guess it will also be a contrasting time for the people about how this current conflict is occurring, and it will be interesting to see what happens on the street

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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After the dramatic lack of response from both Ukraine and the rest of the world after Russian tanks rolled into Crimea and took control in 2014, I guess Putin expected more of the same with the rest of Ukraine. Sure, during the annexing of Crimea there was outrage from the Ukrainian government but they never tried to mount a serious defence, and there were sanctions from the many western countries but they were really only political statememnts rather than serious economic sanctions with bite. The fact that Crimea was historically Russian territory and most of the population were of ethnic Russian heritage had a lot to do with the responses.

Russia has always been like cousins to the Ukraine and that is how the two populations felt about each other but that all changed when Russia took Crimea back. Ukraine felt badly treated by Russia and were almost embarrassed at their inability to keep Russia out. Not just the government but the people in the streets of Ukraine prepared themselves for a solid defence vowing that what happened in Crimea would not happen again.

Putin completely misjuged the situation, as did most of the world. I would be interested to know what would have happened in the latest invasion if the Crimean invasion in 2014 had not happened, because my understanding is that the view of Ukrainians towards Russia completely changed as a result.

Things are continuing to go from bad to worse for Putin. Now both Finland and Sweden are looking at joining Nato so that they have some protection from their beligerant neighbour.

Agree. I was reading recently of the Austrian Leaders talks with Putin. They should all join NATO now. On another note yes there were big ties between Ukraine and Russia but Russian is not Ukraine's first language, Russia banned the use of the native tongue in Ukraine many years ago but the language continued to live due to the resolve of many Ukrainians. Other adjoining countries do speak Russian as a first language, more people speak Russian in Belarus then speak their native tongue. Of course Russian is spoken in Ukraine cities and villages along the Russian border where many of their sympathisers live, the ones who were involved with the MH70 shooting down.
 

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nissan
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It's going to be interesting to see how the Victory Day parades go. I was in St Petersburg for one and it was an extravaganza of military chest-thumping and showing off. Might be a few vehicles and divisions down on previous ones. I guess it will also be a contrasting time for the people about how this current conflict is occurring, and it will be interesting to see what happens on the street
I'm sure there will be a large rent-a-crowd in attendance waving little Russian flags and cheering at appropriate moments.. but I agree that it will be interesting to see if there are couragious protesters prepared to speak against the invasion.

Russian is not Ukraine's first language,
Not originally, but Russian is the first language for many Ukrainians including the president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy. Most Ukrainians are bilingual and speak both languages reasonably fluently although both languages are pretty similar to begin with.

From what I've read, most Russians living in Ukraine were not supportive of Russia taking control of the Donbas and were quite happy not living under Russian control. The seperatists were a small but highly vocal minority with their ranks pumped up by native Russians sent to live there to increase Russian sentiment. BTW China are doing the same thing in Taiwan to improve Chinese sentiment.
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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I'm sure there will be a large rent-a-crowd in attendance waving little Russian flags and cheering at appropriate moments.. but I agree that it will be interesting to see if there are couragious protesters prepared to speak against the invasion.


Not originally, but Russian is the first language for many Ukrainians including the president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy. Most Ukrainians are bilingual and speak both languages reasonably fluently although both languages are pretty similar to begin with.

From what I've read, most Russians living in Ukraine were not supportive of Russia taking control of the Donbas and were quite happy not living under Russian control. The seperatists were a small but highly vocal minority with their ranks pumped up by native Russians sent to live there to increase Russian sentiment. BTW China are doing the same thing in Taiwan to improve Chinese sentiment.
Originally or not, Russian is still not Ukraine's first language, I didn't think the statistics were this high but when I did a search on stats this is what I found, yes, maybe there are many who speak both Ukrainian and Russian but according to this stat 67% of Ukrainians speak their home language. Has a map as well. As I said earlier Russia made it illegal to speak native Ukrainian many years ago, they maintained their language through sheer determination.
 

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Rogue
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I think you'll find that although Ukrainian is the official language, Russian is the lingua franca of Ukraine
 

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Y2KGUII ZD Wgn
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I think you'll find that although Ukrainian is the official language, Russian is the lingua franca of Ukraine
I can only go on what I read, everything I've seen so far indicates Russian is not the major language used on a day to day basis.
 

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