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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for info on this, anyone using it? would appreciate any info on it, good or bad. Is it worth running? Which version? Pitfalls? Pluses?
 

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nissan
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I am running this a my main OS for about 10 years now.

Haven't had any issues but depends on what you need.

It's not the OS, the problem is whether you got other stuffs (printer etc) which supports Linux.
 

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I’m using Ubuntu, which is what Mint is based on. I have it running on an 8yo i5 notebook, and it’s a lot better than windows imho, so long as you just want mainstream programs. Many programs have Linux versions these days, although if you have a program you need to run that has no Linux version there is a windows emulator called WINE that will enable you to continue to use those windows only programs.
I find that Linux loads quicker, is not as resource hungry, and is generally trouble free compared to windows. This also means that it will run on older computers that wouldn’t have a hope of running the latest windows.
One thing you will need though is a 64 bit machine for the latest versions of Linux, although it is still possible to get the older 32 bit versions off the internet. And they are free


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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Thanks, both my laptops are 64bit, I'm thinking of experimenting on the one I just replaced. Have been watching videos on what to do and what not to do with linux, man talk about information overload.............
 

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nissan
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Thanks, both my laptops are 64bit, I'm thinking of experimenting on the one I just replaced. Have been watching videos on what to do and what not to do with linux, man talk about information overload.............

Start with XFCE though, it is far slim OS with all necessary tools.

You can install anything needed later.

If you are after a server OS then nothing beats FreeBSD
 

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Thanks, both my laptops are 64bit, I'm thinking of experimenting on the one I just replaced. Have been watching videos on what to do and what not to do with linux, man talk about information overload.............
You can install it alongside windows in a dual boot setup, then you can wean yourself off windows. You can leave windows installed for those programs where you absolutely must use windows, boot into Linux by default, after a few days you won’t even miss windows. You can transfer over files you use all the time, or you can mount the windows disk and access them from there.
There are a few things that get done differently, but you’ll get used to it and never look back.


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nissan
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I used to run a home server on Linux but i don't think it has the advantages it used to have which was speed and stability. Not that Linux has gotten any worse but these days computers are so much faster and Windows is so much better that the performance advantage Linux once had is minimal. Win10 loads so much faster than Win7 or XP and I use a solid state drive now as well which means the PC starts within seconds of completing the start up post screen. I don't believe I've ever had a Win10 crash either. I've never used Linux as a normal PC because I've wanted something that will play games and some other programs that are likely to be hit and miss with Linux and always needed something that would have drivers for whatever printer/scanner I chose to buy. The Linux machine was only ever used to turn an old PC into something useful where files could be backed up where everyone on the network had access to them. I'll be interested to hear from the Linux diehards what they consider the current advantages are.
 

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I used to run a home server on Linux but i don't think it has the advantages it used to have which was speed and stability. Not that Linux has gotten any worse but these days computers are so much faster and Windows is so much better that the performance advantage Linux once had is minimal. Win10 loads so much faster than Win7 or XP and I use a solid state drive now as well which means the PC starts within seconds of completing the start up post screen. I don't believe I've ever had a Win10 crash either. I've never used Linux as a normal PC because I've wanted something that will play games and some other programs that are likely to be hit and miss with Linux and always needed something that would have drivers for whatever printer/scanner I chose to buy. The Linux machine was only ever used to turn an old PC into something useful where files could be backed up where everyone on the network had access to them. I'll be interested to hear from the Linux diehards what they consider the current advantages are.
For me, I’ve never been one to spend big money on the latest technology so Linux was a way of keeping a perfectly good low-spec computer running long after windows bloat had made it uselessly slow. I guess I just got so frustrated with windows, and the endlessly spinning blue circle. My missus had a cheapish laptop with windows 8 on it, with a free upgrade to win 10. Maybe our fault for not spending a grand plus on something better, but it was slow from the start. Upgraded to win10 and it’s marginally better but still takes forever to start, and don’t get me started on the auto updates - waited all night for one of the early updates to finish!
So to answer your question, the advantages to me is being able to use a previously old and slow laptop in a useful way instead of lashing out a heap of my hard earned for something newer and faster.
Also, as an aside, it’s a fact that the vast majority of viruses and Trojans are written for the windows OS. So even though linux is not 100% secure, you are a lot less likely to be exposed to those things on the Linux platform. Yes, windows defender does a great job, but it’s footprint is large and there are very smart people constantly finding new ways to breach it. I don’t think they could be bothered with Linux systems.


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For me, I’ve never been one to spend big money on the latest technology so Linux was a way of keeping a perfectly good low-spec computer running long after windows bloat had made it uselessly slow. I guess I just got so frustrated with windows, and the endlessly spinning blue circle. My missus had a cheapish laptop with windows 8 on it, with a free upgrade to win 10. Maybe our fault for not spending a grand plus on something better, but it was slow from the start. Upgraded to win10 and it’s marginally better but still takes forever to start, and don’t get me started on the auto updates - waited all night for one of the early updates to finish!
So to answer your question, the advantages to me is being able to use a previously old and slow laptop in a useful way instead of lashing out a heap of my hard earned for something newer and faster.
Also, as an aside, it’s a fact that the vast majority of viruses and Trojans are written for the windows OS. So even though linux is not 100% secure, you are a lot less likely to be exposed to those things on the Linux platform. Yes, windows defender does a great job, but it’s footprint is large and there are very smart people constantly finding new ways to breach it. I don’t think they could be bothered with Linux systems.


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That is basically what I would do, I have my old win10 laptop and it would make a good trial looking at Mint Cinnamon, one of the things often said in anything I've seen or read is you don't need antivirus for Linux.
 

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That is basically what I would do, I have my old win10 laptop and it would make a good trial looking at Mint Cinnamon, one of the things often said in anything I've seen or read is you don't need antivirus for Linux.
I’ve never used an antivirus program on Linux. Enable the firewall, and enable a user password when you set it up. It is possible to have it log you in automatically, but it’s not recommended. With the password, it requires authentication (your password) to make any system changes or install anything. That’s one of the reasons that makes it almost impossible for a virus to install itself. Don’t forget the password because it’s not able to be hacked or retrieved. You would have to do a full reinstall. It’s also a good idea to partition your drive and keep your personal files on a separate drive or partition to the OS.


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Sorry guys the virus would still gets you no matter what.
The advantage used to be that the Unix os had a separate root(admin) account and separate user accounts.
So if a virus attacked it would only attack the user account not the system or other users accounts.
But the windows does the same now.

The major advantage for me is the controlled upgrades (but this is where freebsd shines, nothing comes close) and it's free.
In this age of internet os is pretty much redundant it's all done via browsers.
 

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Sorry guys the virus would still gets you no matter what.
The advantage used to be that the Unix os had a separate root(admin) account and separate user accounts.
So if a virus attacked it would only attack the user account not the system or other users accounts.
But the windows does the same now.

The major advantage for me is the controlled upgrades (but this is where freebsd shines, nothing comes close) and it's free.
In this age of internet os is pretty much redundant it's all done via browsers.
I'm no computer genious, far from it but I seem to remember years ago a selling point for apple was hardly anyone was writing virus code for them, I have heard Linux is in an even better position, is that not the case?
 

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Sorry guys the virus would still gets you no matter what.
The advantage used to be that the Unix os had a separate root(admin) account and separate user accounts.
So if a virus attacked it would only attack the user account not the system or other users accounts.
But the windows does the same now.

The major advantage for me is the controlled upgrades (but this is where freebsd shines, nothing comes close) and it's free.
In this age of internet os is pretty much redundant it's all done via browsers.
Linux still has a root account and separate user accounts. The strength of Unix based OS’s such as Linux and MacOS is that they don’t give administrative access easily, that makes it a lot harder for a virus or malware to gain control of the OS and to install malicious code. Also, with regard to Linux, it’s market share is very low, only a few percent of desktop OS’s are Linux, so there are very few hackers who could be bothered to write malicious code for Linux. Yes, there are viruses that have been written for Linux but compared to windows they are so rare and the Linux system so robust that the chances of infection are very low.


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I'm no computer genious, far from it but I seem to remember years ago a selling point for apple was hardly anyone was writing virus code for them, I have heard Linux is in an even better position, is that not the case?
Yes, that’s true. Nothing is infallible, but you’d have to be very unlucky to get a virus in Linux.


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nissan
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I seem to remember years ago a selling point for apple was hardly anyone was writing virus code for them,
That would have been a long, long time ago. It is still relatively true for Linux though but only up to a point. Click on the wrong thing in a dodgy email and you're more likely to have grief with Linux than Windows because Windows actively checks such links for perceived threats and offers advice. Linux provides no such cautions but if you click on a dodgy link with Linux it is less likely to have grief. Less likely doesn't mean never so you still need to show common sense and caution. Hackers writing current generation ransomware are including Linux compatibility. https://www.bankinfosecurity.com/linux-killdisk-ransomware-cant-decrypt-a-9619
this is where freebsd shines
I ditched Linux for FreeBSD on my home server because FreeBSD handled RAID disc arrays a lot better than Linux at the time and I've not bothered to upgrade anything in 5 years other than feed it hard drives. It just works.
 

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That would have been a long, long time ago. It is still relatively true for Linux though but only up to a point. Click on the wrong thing in a dodgy email and you're more likely to have grief with Linux than Windows because Windows actively checks such links for perceived threats and offers advice. Linux provides no such cautions but if you click on a dodgy link with Linux it is less likely to have grief. Less likely doesn't mean never so you still need to show common sense and caution. Hackers writing current generation ransomware are including Linux compatibility. https://www.bankinfosecurity.com/linux-killdisk-ransomware-cant-decrypt-a-9619

I ditched Linux for FreeBSD on my home server because FreeBSD handled RAID disc arrays a lot better than Linux at the time and I've not bothered to upgrade anything in 5 years other than feed it hard drives. It just works.
Yes it was a long time ago, but I had heard Linux was sitting in a similar position to what Apple had been years ago.

My Beer O'Clock buddy has installed it on a laptop he has, he has run it experimentally off the USB stick he had the programme on with his quite significant desktop unit, but then decided to experiment with this laptop. He has win10 on everything, keeps it up to date and he reckons the Linux is faster, he's running Cinnamon from memory.

So I will be watching carefully from the wings while this develops.
 

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he reckons the Linux is faster
It is faster but it is not the enormous gap it once was. If you have a Win10 machine that is slower than you are happy with then I'd suggest reinstalling Windows. Still not happy? Then consider putting a solid state drive in it but if you don't want to spend a cent then Linux might be just what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It is faster but it is not the enormous gap it once was. If you have a Win10 machine that is slower than you are happy with then I'd suggest reinstalling Windows. Still not happy? Then consider putting a solid state drive in it but if you don't want to spend a cent then Linux might be just what you need.
This is all new to me, I have recently purchased a new laptop, Dell, win 10, 8gig ram an SSD as C and a 1TB normal drive, got a good deal on it. We took away all loading to C so C is just for the laptop running, everything else goes to D (that was a pain in the arse as well as getting rid of one drive 😱). I have my old Hp laptop that runs on win10, had a few issues with it and wonder if linux might help those and give it a second life.
 

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It is ideal for giving older hardware a new lease on life. And the best bit is that you don’t have to get rid of windows, you can install Linux alongside windows and when you boot the computer you can choose which OS to launch.
 

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Gee
Just download mint and put it in a usb boot and see how you feel about it.
Much better if you can experience first handedly.
Anything can go better or worse when it comes to OS and personal preference
 
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