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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,

I've been looking at these forums for years, finally decided to participate.

Bought this old girl brand new, in 1991.
A mate said 'it's a TD42, it'll go forever..!' ...well he wasn't wrong. :D:D

A 30mm lift, polyairs, an alloy bar and a Safari turbo transformed the vehicle into a reliable efficient and surprisingly sprightly tough tourer.

24 years and nearly 500k later, many trips to Fraser and around Oz, as well as being a daily driver, she's still going strong.

Well, after a few years of neglect, this GQ is now my weekend drive, sort of a hobby, and I can start re-building my tough tourer.

Cleaned up the paintwork, new windscreen seal, new door hinges, still chasing the eternal GQ rattles and squeaks...

Next is a 2" lift, Kings progressives all 4 corners.

Here's the car as she is now, on a recent trip to Port Macquarie and Point Plommer.



Patrol_Plommer_01_sm.jpg

Patrol_Beach_01_sm.jpg
 

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nissan
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806 Posts
It looks well looked after
Another 24 years life left in it i'd say
I only wish i looked after the paint on my '91 shorty better, too late now only a repaint will fix it
I still have about 220 000 to catch up to you, you have done well

91shorty
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, 91shorty. Yep, it's been a great truck, and I reckon there's another 20 years left to go. I have had the drivers side resprayed, the repairers did a good job matching the colour.

My next step is new springs all around...
I fitted a lift kit in 1993, Kings light duty progressives up front and some kinda long travel coils from Ultimate at the back, backed up with polyairs. However after 21 years, 400k and lots of corrugations it's pretty much sagged back to standard height with a modest load in the back, and the polyairs are just shredded.

I'm fitting Kings KDPR-42 front and KDPR-43 rear, also new polyairs.

So... Let's try for a fair dinkum before and after comparison.
Below, measurements and photos as it is now, with the old suspension:
Front, guard lip to hub: 560mm
Rear, guard lip to hub: 560mm

Photos show:
the way the vehicle sits now,
the front tyre to spring hat,
and the rear tyre to chassis rail.
Tyres are 265/75R16, near enough to 32" diameter.
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hey there, thanks for the kind comments!

The red paint has done ok over the years, it's been cleaned up and polished about 2 years ago.

Those 265/75's (32" diameter) are somewhat narrow and may 'just barely' miss the flares, I haven't been rock hopping for awhile so I haven't had the chance to damage those factory flares and mudflaps just yet. Time will tell. ;)

I've moved my suspension thread to the suspension forum, 'cos it's becoming a work in progress:
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/suspension-57/kings-progressives-gq-273546/
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
After a few tries, the suspension is looking good. Got the 50mm lift I was after without compromising ride and handling too much.
Finished up going with linear, rather than progressive coils.
My car always looks lower than it really is because of those aftermarket side steps.

Before and after measurements:

Front, guard lip to hub: Before 560mm, after 605mm
Rear, guard lip to hub: Before 560mm, After 610mm

Front coils are Kings KDFR-42H
Rear coils are Kings KDRR-43H
Sway bars are Pedders heavy duty, to control body roll on the highway.
If the weight in the back increases much more, it'll need heavier rear coils.

I learned a lot in the process, gained experience and a few bruises swapping coils and shocks.

Honestly I'd have been better off loading the truck, going to a good suspension place and paying for a 50mm lift. But then I wouldn't know what I know now...
 

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nissan
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55 Posts
Hi All,

I've been looking at these forums for years, finally decided to participate.

Bought this old girl when she was a baby, in 1991.
A mate said 'it's a TD42, it'll go forever..!' ...well he wasn't wrong.


A 30mm lift, polyairs, an alloy bar and a Safari turbo transformed the vehicle into a reliable efficient and surprisingly sprightly tough tourer.

24 years and nearly 500k later, many trips to Fraser and around Oz, as well as being a daily driver, she's still going strong.

Well, after a few years of neglect, this GQ is now my weekend drive, sort of a hobby, and I can start re-building my tough tourer.

Cleaned up the paintwork, new windscreen seal, new door hinges, still chasing the eternal GQ rattles and squeaks...

Next is a 2" lift, Kings progressives all 4 corners.

Here's the car as she is now, on a recent trip to Port Macquarie and Point Plommer.



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[/iurl]

[iurl="http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=254642&d=1436235545"]
[/iurl]
Great read and just goes to show with some tender loving care the GQ will keep on giving, good luck with many more adventures and good job with the suspension lift champ.
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ok... So I've been tinkering with various things on the GQ for the past year or so. As the mood takes me I'll post items here, not in any particular order, but just as they come to mind.
As mentioned at the beginning of this thread, the GQ is now a weekend warrior and a hobby. So I'm free to modify and improve, as long as I don't spend *too* much money...

I've been reading with interest the threads on airboxes. What I took home from the discussions was that a large panel airbox with good air volume each side of the filter element would improve turbo spool and therefore driveability.
So, I borrowed a V8 commodore airbox, jammed it under the bonnet and connected it up with flexi duct like so:


Well, there is an improvement in spool, boost is stronger when pulling from low revs, and there's less smoke under acceleration. So a more permanent install is justified.
The induction noise is impressive to say the least. The turbo screams like a banshee...

The bonnet needs soundproofing, as without soundproofing it rings like a bell. I'd removed the original soundproofing because it was falling apart, so the bonnet is bare metal:


The new bonnet liner arrived from Tru Fit this week, it looks the business!


Sound dampening is a complex process. Luxury car makers put a lot of research and expense into NVH improvement. They use composite sound dampening systems and other tricks.
The designers of the GQ Patrol DX did not regard NVH as a high priority. Let's face it, these things are noisy.
In addition to a sound blocker/absorber such as the liner above, it's good practice to dampen resonance in metal panels. This is why sound dampening mat (Dynamat for example) is so popular.
Simply placing sound dampener in a few locations, as pictured below, has greatly reduced the ringing in the bonnet. Just a few little bits made a huge difference:


Sound dampener is not intended to be a sound insulator. It reduces vibration in panels rather than blocking sound. Of course, reducing vibration will help block some sound, but an insulator will improve performance. This is where the bonnet liner comes in. It's made of two layers, high and low density, which in theory absorbs/blocks a wider range of frequencies. It it supposed to block heat as well. The liner and dampener combined should form an effective sound blocking system.

Presently, the dodgy airbox rubs against the bonnet, which means there's no space for the thickness of the bonnet liner. The airbox needs to be sorted before the liner can be fitted.
 

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TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Ok, so I finally got around to installing the Tru-Fit bonnet liner last week.
It did not 'Truly Fit', two of the clip locations didn't line up, however it was close enough.
Before fitting the liner I heard a lot of valvetrain and injector noise coming from 'high up' through the windscreen, now it's quietened down a fair bit. It's not a magical cure, the Patrol is still noisy, just not as noisy as before.

First I added more sound dampener:


Bonnet liner installed. It looks better than the original:


And the modified clip locations, just had punch a couple of extra holes in the liner, quite simple.


Edit: Added images
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Patrol's last decent run was in March. Sydney to Crescent Head and back.
It was a darn hot weekend for March, mid to high 30's on the trip up.

I have a pyrometer with peak hold, and thermocouples in the inlet manifold & turbo dump, with a switch to select one or the other.

Measured 116 degrees inlet on the drive up, and 452 degrees exhaust on the drive home.
So... there may be room for some extra fuel and boost. However with those inlet temps I feel an intercooler may be of benefit.

With just over 500k on the odometer and over 360k on the Safari turbo I'm wondering what is possible, or worthwhile...
I hear of TD42's with 800k and more on them still going well and I'm wondering how long mine may have left in it.
Since it's no longer my daily driver I've got the option to tinker around a bit. Studying those threads on the TD05, UFI or DC pumps, various intercoolers and now that BW EFR6758 turbo mentioned in the driveability thread.
Improved torque from 1200-3000RPM would certainly transform the drive and allow taller gearing for highway use.

Inlet:


Exhaust:
 

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Premium Member
TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Car Audio Upgrade

Ever since I got my first car (1982 Hilux) I've been looking for perfect car audio.
(Note: Perfect Car Audio doesn't exist)

The original audio system in my GQ Patrol was pretty basic. A radio/cassette and two speakers in the front doors. Pretty much the minimum Nissan could get away with. Lousy Sound.
Over the years I experimented with a variety of new stereos and speakers, with mixed success. Lots of $$$ and time spent...
It was hard to get something that sounded good and would survive the punishment of 4WD touring.

In 1999, I went and got a system professionally installed.
A brand new Clarion DRX9255 stereo, best available at the time, along with a 12-disc stacker (remember those??) and a good quality amplifier.
The most expensive addition was Focal Polyglass 3-way speakers mounted in custom made pods in the doors.
This setup was reliable, and sounded as good as I felt was possible. In fact it sounded better than most home hifi systems.

However... The imaging could have been better, the upper-mids and highs are 'buried' down in the footwells. I needed to move the mids and tweeters higher.
Nullack has explained speaker placement very well in his car audio thread here:
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/auto-electrical-37/my-audio-setup-round-two-277481/
...This project owes a lot to the insights of Nullack and others on this forum. Thanks!

This is the setup as it was in December 2015. A bit frayed around the edges after 16 years and in need of some TLC:

The Clarion DRX9255, still performing as good as new:


And the custom made door pods. You can see where the speakers are placed, with the tweeters on the doors. The MDF in the pods is coming apart after a lot of weather and water:


Going forward, my plan is:
Move the tweeters up onto the 'A' pillars, and recondition the door pods so the mids are angled upward toward the listeners.
Re-install sound deadener in all the doors
Install an under-seat subwoofer
Research and install a new stereo with parametric equalization and time alignment.
 

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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
So, moving on from my earlier post, re-working the speaker installation, I had 3 options:

1) Throw away the 3-way speakers, buy a new set of Focal or Audison 2-way speakers, mount the new widerange tweeter/mids on the 'A' pillars and mount the bass drivers in the doors.

2) Keep the existing 3-way speakers, mount the tweeters on the 'A' pillars, assemble completely new door trims, with the midrange drivers mounted as high as possible near the window winders and angled upwards towards the driver and passenger to improve midrange imaging.

3) Keep the 3-way speakers, mount the tweeters on the 'A' pillars, and modify the existing speaker pods to raise and angle the midrange drivers upwards.


Ok...
I rejected option 1) because I couldn't bring myself to throw away a perfectly good set of high quality speakers. In addition, the door trims had been butchered to accommodate the old install, and would have needed replacement or fabrication.

Option 2) was very attractive and I went as far as modelling new door trims and speaker mounts in cardboard. See the pics below. Eventually rejected simply due to the amount of fabrication and trimming work involved for a minimal advantage.


Option 3) was the way I chose. It retained the existing door trims, pods and speakers, and re-arranged everything for better sound quality. I got to work stripping the speakers out of the pods and preparing to re-locate the midrange drivers as high as possible.

So...
We start out with the existing pods, with space for three speakers.


I'll retain the bass driver as-is, remove the tweeter, and cut a space as high as possible to mount the midrange:


The midrange is mounted on it's own piece of MDF which is then epoxied into the main pod. Gaps are filled and reinforced with timber wedges and builders bog.


The finished pods, Note the driver and passenger side have the midrange at different angles. This directs best possible sound towards the driver, and also helps prevent damage to the midrange driver from clumsy passengers.


At this stage, a quick listening test revealed a great improvement in sound accuracy. The higher frequencies were clear and well defined. Acoustic guitars and vocals, fantastic.

Now, all that's needed is cloth covers for the main pods and a permanent mounting arrangement for the 'A' pillar tweeters...
 

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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Speaker covers/trims

No job is complete until it looks neat and tidy.

The original speaker pods had nice cloth trim stretched over lightweight MDF frames and I wanted the same look in my finished product.

Made up lightweight 3d frames from MDF to accommodate the angled midrange drivers, painted the frames black and covered them with black speaker cloth... Here's the driver's side frame in progress, held in place with epoxy putty...


The finished product looks clean and simple, and works really well.
 

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Rust is just natural weight reduction.
1986 SD33T SWB
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The speaker pods look good Rick, nice work.

Did your GQ have those terrible little 4" round speakers in the door from the factory?
 

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TD42 GQ
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1,079 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The speaker pods look good Rick, nice work.

Did your GQ have those terrible little 4" round speakers in the door from the factory?
Thanks! The project was easy enough, but took a lot of time to get the detail right...

Yep, my GQ had those little 4" paper speakers, even though the doors had holes for 5.5" speakers. Within weeks of taking delivery I'd replaced them with a set of basic Alpine speakers.
 

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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Tweeter Placement

What started this project was my desire to move the tweeters to a higher, unobstructed location to improve the high end detail and imaging.
Before I began the exercise with the main speaker pods, I tried moving the tweeters to various locations on the doors, dash and 'A' pillars, eventually deciding that a location on the 'A' pillars about 10cm above the dash sounded the best and gave a clear line of sight to each. In this location, the improvement in audio quality was amazing...

To begin with, I just attached the tweeter with double sided tape, since I was moving them around regularly.


Once the main speaker pods were modified and working properly, it was time to look at a permanent arrangement for the tweeters which would look good.
The DX GQ has plain painted pillars which are quite narrow, pretty much the same width as the tweeter diameter. There was no way I wanted to drill or damage the 'A' pillars.
So, I made up some simple plates from sheet aluminium, which would slide between the windscreen rubber seal and the 'A' pillar, and be secured along the door by the pinch weld seal.
The tweeters were attached to these aluminium plates, and speaker cloth was stretched across the whole assembly prior to fitting to the vehicle.
Now, the 'A' pillars are classy black matte cloth from dash to roof lining, with only a bump showing where the tweeter is mounted.
The whole arrangement looks and sounds great, and goes a long way towards appeasing my OCD...
 

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Y61=WIN
nissan
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3,003 Posts
Top shelf mate. The enhanced speaker location is a winner. Having done it myself I know how important it is. I see you went for an off axis setup which is clever given the focals reputation in that area.

Workmanship is excellent you should be proud of that Rick
 

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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #19
Top shelf mate. The enhanced speaker location is a winner. Having done it myself I know how important it is. I see you went for an off axis setup which is clever given the focals reputation in that area.

Workmanship is excellent you should be proud of that Rick
Thanks mate, it took a lot of time to get the details right and I'm happy with the result.
Yes, the off-axis setup works very well with the Focal tweeters. Basically from the driver's seat both tweeters have very similar volume level due to their directional characteristics. Tilting the midranges up towards the driver also helps a lot.
If anything, the highs are now maybe too prominent and there's a 'hole' in the upper mids. Backing off the treble control helps a little, however ultimately some form of equalization is required.
Logically I should replace the venerable DRX9255 with a new stereo that has FLAC, time alignment and equalization. But I really like the old stereo and it 'ain't broke'... I'll procrastinate a little while longer...
 

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TD42 GQ
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Subwoofer

Some would say no car stereo is complete without a subwoofer.
Certainly, where I live in western Sydney it would seem to be essential.
Doof, Doof, Doof... ...All the time...

Not to be outdone, when my car audio was professionally installed in 1999, I got an expensive 12" Focal sub, to match the nice 3-way speakers.
This sub went... Doof, Doof, Doof... ...and it was very good...

The thing took up a lot of space though. Whenever I went on a decent trip I'd remove it and leave it at home, so it really didn't get much work, unlike the rest of system which went everywhere.

Anyway, fast forward to 2016. Re-think and re-install the speakers, everything sounding fantastic, if a little bass-shy.
So... Go to the spare room, grab the sub and hook it up to the amp. 50Hz low pass filter, 12dB/octave, all pretty standard. Adjustable level control on the dash.
Sit myself behind the wheel, find a dynamic test track, crank up the sub...
Doof, Doof, Doof... ...All is well..!

A bit more volume... Let's crank it up until the doors rattle and then then back it off a bit hey? What could possibly go wrong?

Doof, Doof, Doof...
Doof, Doof, Doof...
Doof, Doof, Doof...

...A bit more Power...

Splat Splat Splat..!

...wtf..? :(

...To Be Continued...
 
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