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Discussion Starter · #282 ·
How's your progress rick all sorted and can you feel the difference
Well, I was making ok progress then real life responsibilities came along and put a hold on the project.
I spent a lot of time learning to TIG weld. Would have been more efficient to fit things up and take them to a fabricator, but I wanted to learn a new set of skills.
Here's the MR2 radiator for the front, showing the 90° elbow going through an existing void in the radiator panel, as well as a patch welded over the hole in the tank where the original pipe used to be.
The plan is, this w2a system will fit up without the need for cutting any holes in bodywork.
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Once the radiator is completed, the heat exchanger will be next. It needs a filler cap and overflow added, then it needs to be correctly mounted above the rocker cover.
 

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That's cool, yep I know what you mean about ally it's something I'm wanting to get into also
Have you got pics of you pump location and layout, this mod will be in the mix maybe this year too
 

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Discussion Starter · #284 ·
The plan is to put a Davies Craig coolant pump inside the bull bar on the driver's side. This will place the pump at the lowest point in the system. Exact mounting details are yet to be worked out, probably some cotton reel isolators along with a splash guard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #285 ·
It's been weeks since I've driven the Patrol so this afternoon I started and warmed it up just to keep things lubricated.
Here's a thermal camera image taken after a few minutes at idle - I took a few of these pics however this overall one is kind of interesting.
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Discussion Starter · #286 ·
Patrol went to my regular mechanics for a service yesterday.
Replaced the clutch hydraulics and adjusted the valve clearances. Inlets were fine, exhaust had closed up a bit.
Anyway, the idle is so much smoother now and the old td42 seems to pull better.

Now that the tappets are sorted out, I'm free to install the heat exchanger for the W2A intercooler.
My original plan was to do the intercooler then think about a turbo upgrade later because the existing Safari turbo "ain't broken"

BUT.
Doing the intercooler before the turbo seems back to front.
Perhaps I should work on the bottom of the engine bay before I start adding stuff to the top...

Also, I've become the proud owner of a little Mamba TD05/16G.
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Also, I'd like to drill the exhaust manifold for an intercooler bracket.
There's already undrilled bosses on that manifold, I'm guessing for a heat shield that was never fitted.
Those bosses would be nicely placed for an intercooler support bracket.
If I'm careful I can probably drill and tap blind holes in those bosses.
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I'd also like to add sensors to the exhaust manifold, for pre turbo EGT and perhaps EMP. More drilling and tapping.

Looking at other posts on this forum, it seems @OldMav and @bambill think the old Safari manifold is ok.
It's a pre-EGR design, so it's nice and simple.
The flange looks like it'll match the Mamba TD05. I still need to verify the flange angle is sufficient for the TD05 to clear the block.
The Safari manifold is also divided front from back. In fact I've seen the Safari manifold mentioned as a good match for a dual-scroll turbo. That's beyond my scope though.
I think Oldmav mentioned somewhere that a bit of die grinding would help the Safari manifold, I'm not sure where, was it the divider at the turbo flange or was it exhaust port matching?

Anyway. That's my thoughts. Turbo upgrade before intercooler. Saves removing then replacing the intercooler twice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #287 ·
Well, I finally managed to weld the w2a radiator and get it watertight. Probably had 8 goes at getting it right. Welding faults included pinholes, a porous spot as well as poor penetration in a few places, because I was scared of burning a hole in the tanks.
I'm pretty sure the tanks are a different grade of alloy to the tube stock, as they seem to have different melting points.
Anyway, this has been a good learning experience. I now have at least a little bit of confidence with a TIG welder.

Testing now... the radiator is half filled with water, then pumped up to 22psi using a simple bicycle pump. Since I intend to use a 7psi radiator cap, I'm assuming 22psi is a high enough test pressure. It's held pressure for 24 hours so far with no leaks.
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So far I have not had any issue with different grades/types of ally. I have even welded cast to normal without any issue (I did use different filler rod though).

What does make it a bit trickier is material thicknesses. Are the tanks and tube different thicknesses???
 

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Discussion Starter · #289 ·
So far I have not had any issue with different grades/types of ally. I have even welded cast to normal without any issue (I did use different filler rod though).

What does make it a bit trickier is material thicknesses. Are the tanks and tube different thicknesses???
Yes, different thicknesses and different surface areas. The 32mm tube has thin 1.2mm walls, and it was just too easy to burn through. Pinholes galore there.
The tanks are maybe 1.8 thick with existing welds in places, and I was also trying to weld at an awkward angle. Those tanks suck up a lot of heat.
I lost count of the number of times I dipped the tungstens
It would have been easier and more sensible to tack it up and take it to a professional. But... I wanted to learn a new set of skills outside of my comfort zone.
 

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In my limited experience, welding around a corner is more difficult, as it is harder to maintain your distances of tungsten and filler rod when moving around the corner. The distance changes as you move around the curve. And of course the angle changes too. Much harder than welding in straight lines.

I simply had to weld in short sections, and then move the work piece to re-position. This is obviously not how the pros do it, but it works well enough. I have seen videos of people welding with their hands unsupported, but I am no good at that. Even with my MIG, which I have had for 20 years, I still need a hand rest to be accurate. Needing two hands for the TIG makes it even tricker for me. So I need a rest, and have to move the piece to be in good position. Or I dip the tungsten constantly, which is a mess as you know. Being able to sit down at a proper welding bench helps a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #291 ·
Some of the angles on the radiator job were quite awkward, I was standing on one leg, operating the pedal with the other and leaning my torch hand on the rad while trying not to fall over.
Anyway it was a learning experience... starting with zero skills.
Next is the heat exchanger. Deciding just how to do the brackets on that. I can weld bosses to the exchanger and make a frame from steel, or weld an alloy frame directly onto the exchanger.
Or tack it up and take it to a fabricator!
In either case the frame will attach to the engine using cotton reel vibration mounts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #292 ·
So....
Having finished the w2a radiator it's time to work on the heat exchanger.
This heat exchanger is an eBay unit with a 110x110x250mm core that I purchased last year then set aside.
It looks solidly made and has 76mm air inlets.
I've marked up the hot/cold inlets/outlets as well as a spot for an air bleed screw.
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The heat exchanger will go across the top of the engine in place of the existing cast duct.
Mounting points will be the 2 threaded holes on the inlet manifold, and an existing bracket on the exhaust manifold studs.
There'll be a 76mm to 63mm silicone elbow going to the inlet manifold and some sort of adapter pipe going from the turbo to the hot air inlet.
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BUT: Now that I'm looking closer at the heat exchanger, I'm becoming dissatisfied by the small size of the coolant inlets.
They are 1/2bsp, or ~20mm overall. I'm guessing a 1/2bsp barb will only have an internal diameter of 15mm at best?
Add to that, the largest hose barb in 1/2bsp seems to be 19mm.
Having used 25mm and 32mm hose tails on the radiator, I'm reluctant to use 19mm hose or to compromise on the coolant volume at the heat exchanger.
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I'm wondering if I should perhaps drill those holes out to 25mm or even 32mm, then weld (or epoxy) an alloy tube in place for hose attachment...

At the same time, a filler needs to be added, and the filler should be the highest point in the system.
Maybe I should drill a 32mm hole where that black circle is shown in the pic above, and weld/epoxy a 32mm inline filler such as the one pictured below...
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Or am I over thinking things?
Most other installations seem to use 19mm hose and the 1/2bsp barbs.
Could just use 19mm hose and hang a 19mm filler inline with the hose, attached to the firewall?
That'd be a nice high spot but it'd be ugly.
 

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You have answered all your own question. To summarise 25mm hose pressure side 32mm suction side, change the fitting sizes on the exchanger to 25mm, weld 25mm tube to the tanks, I prefer the filler on the tank like you suggest. Doesn't really need a pressure relief cap but they work sometimes. The system will never get hot enough at your level of tune, even mine never gets hot enough, If you are happy not to use a relief cap just use a 3/8 bsp plug in the highest tank on top. Then you can use a 3/8 bsp to 1/2 barb to connect a hose and bottle to purge the system connect bottle to the bonnet etc. Purge system cold. If you are still OCD with relief cap you can fit it in the line anywhere with a overflow tank so fluid can be sucked back into system when cold, (never happens). Don't use glycol unless you are in freezing conditions, Fluid like penrite 10 tenths is a lot better with less expansion (so not requiring a relief cap). If you use a soft silicone 25mm hose the hose will expand and contract with temp expansion (so even less requirement for a relief cap).
 

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Discussion Starter · #294 ·
Thanks Peter, you're right, I answered most of my own questions, I guess I needed to know I was on the right track and your reply helps a lot.
Every sentence of your reply contains information that's worth remembering..

Interesting what you say about not needing a pressure cap, I'll keep that in mind.

You guessed my next questions: Hoses and coolant type.
By soft silicone hose, you mean that silicone hose by manufacturers like Aeroflow and Turbosmart? I was looking at silicone hose, or that spiral-reinforced smooth-bore "bilge" hose, because they are flexible. I have a 1m length of heavy duty coolant hose and it's overkill, too heavy and rigid to place correctly.
I didn't know about the Penrite 10 Tenths coolant. Thanks for pointing it out. I would've just used the same glycol coolant that's in the engine. On my July trips I do tend to spend some time in the New England highlands and I've seen it get down to -7 outside, but under the bonnet the temps stay above freezing even overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #296 ·
I finally decided to take a hole saw to the heat exchanger so it'd accept a 25mm barb...
Starting out with a 1/2bspt hole, placed tape behind to catch any debris and screwed in a softwood bung. Used the bung to guide the auger for the first 5mm then removed the auger for the remaining 10mm or so. The thread depth was marked on the hole saw so I'd know when to be really careful, didn't want to damage the intercooler tubes.
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A 25mm tube can now be welded or epoxied in.
Worked quite well for a first attempt and nothing but a hand drill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #297 ·
Still working out the mounting brackets. Modelled this up from a piece of scrap, the bracket will weld to the tank and the rubber vibration isolators will line up with a bracket made to fit the existing tapped holes on the manifold.
This stuff is only 2mm. I have some 4mm plate, just need to work out how to bend it without cracking.
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Discussion Starter · #299 ·
While waiting for some parts to arrive for the heat exchanger, I took the opportunity to make a bracket and relocate the horns, which have to be moved to make way for the w2a radiator.
This bracket uses existing mounting points and the horns fit nicely behind the grille without blocking air to the radiator.
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Bracket looks neat. (y)

As for making other parts, I agree with John. I have a sheet of 3mm ally that I use to make odds and sods, and it is more accurate to cut each side, or piece etc, and then weld them together. You end up with sharp corners and it won't weaken the ally either compared to bending.
 
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