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Rogue
nissan gu patrol
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
G'Day all,

I just got hold of one of these

Reconyx cameras. Digital time-lapse livestock security cameras and wildlife research surveillance. Infrared (infra red) IR automatic motion detection trail cameras for surveys, research and automated monitoring. Covert night vision cameras, license p

I'm not going to be hunting (unfortunatley), I will be setting it up to observe people vandalising, gaining illegal access, stealing, etc. Has anyone have experiences with using CCTV as evidence?
The camera will be on private property and public land.
 

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nissan patrol
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yeah, wave goodbye to ur money if somone who knows what there doing and how to find them is in the area
 

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Nissan Patrol
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http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lrc.nsf/pages/r98chp02

2.51 The increased availability and affordability of surveillance technology has resulted in a growing number of people using surveillance equipment, video, audio-visual or sensor devices, usually in their homes. While primarily used for home security purposes, an emerging trend is to install video cameras to monitor baby-sitters, or even other family members.96 The Commission initially considered creating an exemption from the proposed legislation for surveillance conducted in private homes. On further reflection, however, the Commission realised that this could lead to serious breaches of privacy. For example, security cameras operating from a private home could be used to monitor activity in a neighbour’s backyard. Complications also arise in multiple occupancy dwellings, where the interests of owners and residents may conflict. In one case reported to the Commission, the owners of a strata development installed video cameras in the common area to monitor people entering and leaving the lifts. The cameras were, however, trained on the front door of one of the home units, causing the resident to complain to the Privacy Committee of New South Wales (as it then was).97

2.52 The adage that a “man’s home is his castle” is all very well, but the rights of a property owner or resident must be measured against other legitimate interests. The Commission is of the view that the fact that a home is private does not mean that anyone who dwells, visits or works there (as in the baby-sitter example given above) must surrender their privacy. As the Commission noted above,98 privacy is a personal, not a property interest, and should not diminish because a person has entered the home of another. Accordingly, the Commission sees no reason to distinguish between regulating surveillance conducted in a private home and surveillance conducted anywhere else.

2.53 It should be remembered that the manner in which surveillance devices are used in homes in many cases would not amount to surveillance within the Commission’s proposed definition, and would therefore not be regulated under any surveillance legislation. A video or sound recording of a child’s birthday party, for example, would not fall within the definition of surveillance recommended by the Commission, as it is not made for the purpose of monitoring the children, but for recreational purposes99 and as an electronic keepsake.

2.54 Where activity does fall within the Commission’s recommended definition, compliance with the proposed legislation would not be unduly onerous for those conducting surveillance in a private home. The Commission considers that where surveillance is undertaken in a random, non-targeted fashion as part of a home security system, no prior authorisation should be needed. However, those conducting this type of surveillance must abide by the eight legislative principles100 (preventing inappropriate use of surveillance equipment and the material obtained as a result) developed by the Commission to regulate overt surveillance.101

2.55 There may be occasions, however, where a resident wishes to conduct targeted surveillance of a particular subject within their home. To take the baby-sitter example again, a parent may have reason to suspect that the baby-sitter is harming the child and may wish to have video evidence before terminating the employment or calling the police, but not want the baby-sitter to be aware of the surveillance. In this situation, prior authorisation would be required under the Commission’s recommendations. Indeed, this type of surveillance is already covered by the Workplace Video Surveillance Act 1998 (NSW) (“Workplace Video Surveillance Act”) as it is in the context of an employment relationship.102
 

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Home security cameras are creating privacy concerns for Sydney neighbours | thetelegraph.com.au

It will make a submission explaining no laws exist to control the operation of security cameras.

NSW Council for Civil Liberties secretary Stephen Blanks backed the call.

"The cost of the systems has come down phenomenally - the use has increased and you have everything from the professional systems to basic webcams," he said.

"We have had many complaints from people about this.

"There is nothing to protect people.

"There is no privacy law that gives effective remedy to this situation."

Mr Blanks said a previous Australian Law Reform Commission response found there should be a protection against gross invasion of privacy.

"If these security systems are observing people in their property or in their houses, it can be a gross invasion of privacy," he said.






Record away ;)
 

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Currently in PAD rehab
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Recently after some douche thought it was funny to stand on the back of the missus car and throw a big rock through the back window at 2am (not even sure why they did it!) the cops asked us if we had camera footage of it to give them. Unfortunately we didnt so we go stuck with the repairs.

Really nice of them, especially with a sick kid who might need hospital at any minuite to have some ******** do that.

Im putting cameras up, you can get 4 camera DVR's from china inc 500gig hdd and network for remote uploading and phone viewing for $300-$400. Bugger it, i think it must be the world we live in.

Mate is a lawyer, he says while home shot video footage might not be admissible in court, it can certainly be used by the cops to identify and get an admission from the dip**** responsible.
 

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Currently in PAD rehab
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I sprung some kids trying to steal my letterbox once. Instead of chasing them and giving them some thing to boast about i just let them know that i knew where they lived.

The next day i saw one of the little turds at the shops with his parents. I calmly went up to the parents and asked if they knew where their son was last night.. they said he was at his friends place and gave me 'the look'. I explained what i saw them doing, and described his friend to seal the deal. I havnt seen them since...

A neighbor of mine who is an angry bikie looking guy explained what he would do if he caught them on his property, i think they got off easy with my approach.. doesnt involve driving them out to the forest and leaving them there..

I say go for it, if they are on your property recording them for evidence is your right especially in the wee hours of the morning, if they dont like it, then bad luck, go find something else constructive to do.. Maybe putting up a sign which says that you will be recorded gets around some legality?
 

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The Bear
nissan
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Remote controlled Motion Sensing Phalanx system is the go. Just make your own graphite bullets :D
I know where there's some half spent uranium fuel rods going cheap, not all of them are still round :D
 

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nissan
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My understanding is that for court use it needs to have time and date stamp on the recording (which is not erasable). Be mindful that most cameras out there are very dependant on good lighting and the price spirals upwards if you want good resolution, or want them to work in poor light. Don't know what kind of surveillance you want to do but test it out.i have seen people try to use poor quality recording and honestly it is not worth the effort. If you want to discourage a scumbag from damaging property then good lighting (eg motion activating floodlights)is better than an average camera. Don't forget that a camera wont stop the a-holes, only tape them.. For covert ops best to go with good resolution and try to place in a location that will have some light to enhance image.
 

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nissan patrol
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Hey mate be very careful with cheap Chinese products.. The reason I say this is im security tech and I've seen ppl cheap out and when something happens its useless due to cheap hardrives, power supplys and cameras... The cameras are the cheapest part (unless it's a ptz) and you will be looking at 1k for a decent dvr.. If you need equipment I can recommend a place that will deal with you at trade price
Goodluck Marty
 

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nissan
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My understanding is that for court use it needs to have time and date stamp on the recording (which is not erasable). Be mindful that most cameras out there are very dependant on good lighting and the price spirals upwards if you want good resolution, or want them to work in poor light. Don't know what kind of surveillance you want to do but test it out.i have seen people try to use poor quality recording and honestly it is not worth the effort. If you want to discourage a scumbag from damaging property then good lighting (eg motion activating floodlights)is better than an average camera. Don't forget that a camera wont stop the a-holes, only tape them.. For covert ops best to go with good resolution and try to place in a location that will have some light to enhance image.
Yes you are right, in court only footage that is "watermarked" , as explained above, is admissable. From memory this dictates the compression used at the recording stage also.
The quality of cameras is way up now and very affordable compared to a few years back.............when I imported over 12,000 of them.......:(


Cheers
Anthony
 

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nissan patrol gq
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I install cctv systems now and then and depending what area u live in they attract the bad eggs. They'll steal the cameras.ive had a $1100 ptz stolen that I dynabolted hardcore to tilt up and it was at least 10m in the air. Reviewed HDD and they threw a rope round it and tied it to their car. Fk nuts thought they were outta view but clearly got their number plate. Busted.

Have a basic system at home, and dvr sent me a email to let me know there was motion detected during the hours I had set it up for to report. Opened up dvr on phone and saw a dude trying to smash my door down.took a snapshot with phone. Rang police sent image of his face. And was picked up ten minuets later at the shops.busted hardcore he had a warrant for arrest from Victoria.

So I guess its horses for courses.
 

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nissan patrol gq
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Yeah for court it needs a proper water mark. A lot can be deleted or Photoshopd.
But as the police told me its still a great way to get the average joe to admit to it.

And u should try to set them up so a camera can see another camera.
There is some killa technology out. But it costs mega bucks. A few years back a saw a demo of the number place recognition and face tracking. Blew me away.
 

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Rogue
nissan gu patrol
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok these are to be installed at reasonably remote location or at least large enough locations that lighting is pointless. The camera has date & time water marked and other bull**** like temp and moon cycle (hunting camera). It will be used to catch people not deter them, that's what the signage is for.
 
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