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Y61=WIN
nissan
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Discussion Starter #1
Gday

So my recovery hooks have rust especially the slim metal keeper on error thingy

Figured I would strip, scrub, sand, rust prime then dunno!

I thought safety yellow

Got no idea what type of paint to use (enamel?)

to brush

buy it in a can? (no air gun)

How the hell do I make it last so I'm not doing this job in a few months? :)

thanks for the wisdom fellas
 

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Have you considered getting it powdercoated?

That would last the longest but it would eventually wear and chip off.

Otherwise just use killrust or similar metal paint from the hardware store. Clean up as best you can prime and paint. Just as easy to use a spray can than brushing.

Can't see why you shouldn't paint it yellow.

Cheers

Justin
 

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Mine are red because of rules for what I use it for. I used about 10 coats of cheap enamel.
They chip if you look at them sharply. Sand blast and powdercoat would be a good idea.
 

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I agree with red. As far as I know, this is a motor sport standard, so at a quick look most people will recognize a red recovery point than a yellow 1. And yeah, just any old spray pack of red will do, just give it another quick spray holding up some cardboard or paper to stop it getting on other areas if it gets a bit shabby.
 

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Car Manufacturers use yellow for things the driver needs to on a regular basis like oil dipsticks washer and overflow bottles. (Never picked up on it until recently when it was pointed out to me)
 

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I'd be recomending LIC 40 which is a 2 pack which can be brushed, rolled or sprayed and is harder then any other 2 pack or powder coat i've ever seen. Its really cheap also. Anyone who sells Valspar paints will have it.

It's that hard that the test samples we painted where smashed with a sledge hammer and we could chip the paint.:shock:

Cheers Mick.
 

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Y61=WIN
nissan
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Nick, dont have any experience with LIC 40 but I'll look into it sounds like the stuff

Thanks others, yeah Ill go red to keep it consistent to standards
 

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Y61=WIN
nissan
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Discussion Starter #10
Mate I dont have any experience with this stuff so I need to be advised please of why powdercoating would be better

I've been doing some web research and it seems LIC40 is a polyurethane enamel which seems similar to Imron. Imron seems well regarded as the toughest paint that you can but. Aircraft use polyurethane over urethane enamel. Apparently the poly stuff is the best in paints.

Is there a standardised repeatable test I can use to compare?
 

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Previously known as twodiffs
1991 GQ Safari.
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I did mine in fire engine red or high glow orange...can't remember which now as they have faded and chipped a bit so are up for redoing anyway.

When i did them I sprayed on about 5-6 coats and when they were dry I stuck them in swmbo's oven and baked them.

Came out good and that was about a year ago. I was happy as a camper....swmbo wasn't too impressed LOL.
 

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Powder coating a recovery hook will cost about $10 to $15.

It will be a superior and more durable finish to anything you can do yourself.

Cheers

Justin
 

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Mate I dont have any experience with this stuff so I need to be advised please of why powdercoating would be better

I've been doing some web research and it seems LIC40 is a polyurethane enamel which seems similar to Imron. Imron seems well regarded as the toughest paint that you can but. Aircraft use polyurethane over urethane enamel. Apparently the poly stuff is the best in paints.

Is there a standardised repeatable test I can use to compare?
I've actually done all the testing in a training centre over 2 days. We compared a couple of different types of powder coat, serveral different types of automotive paint and the LIC 40 left them all for dead. Anyone who says Powdercoat is stronger then LIC40 has never used it or used it incorrectly. Actually even used incorrectly it was still better then powdercoat. We even had a couple of Reps from 3M asking what the paint was we where using as they had never seen paint adhere so well either.

I wanted a paint that could withstand not just your standard stone chips but a paint that could withstand tools getting thrown in a tool box thats painted, horses kicking the crap out of it, high pressure weater blasting etc. We are using this paint on horse floats that range from basic up until top of the range 5th wheelers where money is no object.

Powder coat didn't come close to this. It seems John Deer and Caterpillar agreed with me as they are now using the same products on all there machinery instead of Powdercoat. ARB are now using it on there diff guards too.;)

Also it's still only about the same price of acrylic.

For the record until I actually got to use this product and test it to it's limits I would have said powdercoat would be the strongest paint out there to and believe me it took a fair bit of convincing as I didn't want to be responable for all our horse floats delaminating.

The only thing you have to remember with this product is if it's bare metal it has to be finished off with 80 grit and no finer or a sandblasted finish is also fine and if it's an already painted surface then I finish it off with 180 or 240 at the finest.

Cheers Mick.
 

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I've actually done all the testing in a training centre over 2 days. We compared a couple of different types of powder coat, serveral different types of automotive paint and the LIC 40 left them all for dead. Anyone who says Powdercoat is stronger then LIC40 has never used it or used it incorrectly. Actually even used incorrectly it was still better then powdercoat. We even had a couple of Reps from 3M asking what the paint was we where using as they had never seen paint adhere so well either.

I wanted a paint that could withstand not just your standard stone chips but a paint that could withstand tools getting thrown in a tool box thats painted, horses kicking the crap out of it, high pressure weater blasting etc. We are using this paint on horse floats that range from basic up until top of the range 5th wheelers where money is no object.

Powder coat didn't come close to this. It seems John Deer and Caterpillar agreed with me as they are now using the same products on all there machinery instead of Powdercoat. ARB are now using it on there diff guards too.;)

Also it's still only about the same price of acrylic.

For the record until I actually got to use this product and test it to it's limits I would have said powdercoat would be the strongest paint out there to and believe me it took a fair bit of convincing as I didn't want to be responable for all our horse floats delaminating.

The only thing you have to remember with this product is if it's bare metal it has to be finished off with 80 grit and no finer or a sandblasted finish is also fine and if it's an already painted surface then I finish it off with 180 or 240 at the finest.

Cheers Mick.
Thanks for putting that in to context if you were a big supporter of powder coating and this product has changed you mind through extensive testing then you have me very interested and it must be good stuff!

Can you buy it in a spray can?

I haven't been able to find much online in an Australian context.

Cheers

Justin
 

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Can you buy it in a spray can?
No, you can't get it in a pressure pack, it's a 2 pack polyurethane enamel, 4 parts base, 1 part activator (plus reducer if spraying).
 

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As mentioned it's 4 parts paint to 1 part hardener plus 15 to 20% reducer if spraying but it can be rolled or brushed. I haven't rolled or brushed it yet but from what i've been told it levels out really well.

Another thing worth mentioning is the drying times between coats. Being an automotive painter by trade this took a little getting used too.:rolleyes:

Your first coat is like a normal guide coat and you have to wait until it's touch dry. This can take 10 minutes. Then the second coat is a normal wet coat which will require about 20 minutes flashoff before you put on the last coat. When I mean touch dry I mean so you can run your hand over the paint without marking it at all. With the Valspar Hardener in it, it's designed to stay really wet for a long time to illimiate dry edges when doing large objects or machinery. As there is only one type of hardener the trade secret to making it dry a little quicker between coats is to use an acrylic thinner in it instead of the valspar.

It still takes a little while to dry between coats but don't ever get inpatient and say thats dry enough as it will run everywhere because it's 45 microns per coat. Your average automotive paint is about 15 micons so this is where it gets it hiding & filling power from. Also never try and put more then just the tack coat plus 2 wet coats on otherwise it will run and possably boil.

Yes there are a few colours in it but there limited to just solid colours at the moment. There is also one other big plus for this product. You can use the binder as a clear on it's own with hardener and reducer and clear straight over bare metal so you if have some flash welds you want to show off then now you can. I haven't tried this yet but i'm keen to do a few tests and see how it's looks.

I hope this answers most of your questions.

Cheers Mick.
 
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