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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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The discovery of a plannet that takes 900,000 years to orbit it's sun is an astounding development in earth based space exploration, I was looking for a thread suitable but decided to start one, I think there are others like me that find this sort of stuff very interesting.

Astronomers find galaxy's largest solar system - CNN.com
 

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Every dog has his day
nissan
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I have an app on phone/iPad that allows you to point it at sky in any direction and screen moves around and shows you the names of the naked eye viewable stars, constellations and planets live as you're looking.

Fascinating, love it, sometimes lie on the back lawn when there's a new moon and try to learn some of the brighter objects.
 

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nissan
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If you've got some binoculars have a gander through them at the stars, there's a surprising amount you can see with bins. Preferably big lens low power 50mm objectives and 12x or lower are great. Compact high power ones won't show so much. Use an app like Leethal mentioned and find some globular clusters. Awesome. I've got a pretty decent telescope rig (still back in the UK trying to work out how to ship the big b*stard over). Camping out bush you will see much much more than in the burbs of a major city obviously.
 

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LED ZEPPELIN
1995 GQ TD42 NA
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You can also see the roughly square shape of the ISS with binoculars. I have an email notification from NASA for each ISS pass that is visible from where I live, and also an app that tracks it in real time and also can be set up with visible pass alarms. Very cool to see that thing shooting overhead at 28,000km/h :)

Am slowly getting into the stargazing thing - I mean, I've been staring into deep space since I was a kid, but never really thought that much about the specifics of each point of light. I know how to spot the visible planets but that's about it.

Gee I'm going to take the kids to the Wappa Observatory sometime soon, you ever been?
 

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I remember once my uncle coming up from Sydney and staying for a few nights said he couldn't get over the amount of stars he could see, said you don't see that in western Sydney at night.
 

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TD42 GQ
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Thanks for starting this thread!
I've been into stargazing for decades... Built up a collection of telescopes, mounts and cameras over the years. Got some great colour photos of globular clusters and nebulae. Spent many nights under the stars, all pleasant memories!
The iceinspace.com.au Australian astronomy forum is great to check out and see what 'amateur' astronomers can achieve...
 

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nissan
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If all the stars we see at night are in the Milky Way, Just imagine how big the universe is when most of the objects in this picture are galaxies similar to our Milky Way
 

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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Discussion Starter #10
You can also see the roughly square shape of the ISS with binoculars. I have an email notification from NASA for each ISS pass that is visible from where I live, and also an app that tracks it in real time and also can be set up with visible pass alarms. Very cool to see that thing shooting overhead at 28,000km/h :)

Am slowly getting into the stargazing thing - I mean, I've been staring into deep space since I was a kid, but never really thought that much about the specifics of each point of light. I know how to spot the visible planets but that's about it.

Gee I'm going to take the kids to the Wappa Observatory sometime soon, you ever been?

No I haven't been there, but know where it is, name the date.

Thanks for starting this thread!
I've been into stargazing for decades... Built up a collection of telescopes, mounts and cameras over the years. Got some great colour photos of globular clusters and nebulae. Spent many nights under the stars, all pleasant memories!
The iceinspace.com.au Australian astronomy forum is great to check out and see what 'amateur' astronomers can achieve...
Put some pics up. I have a 150x750, not an expensive one but I can see the rings of Saturn and the storms of Jupiter when the time is right and I put my mind to it, bloody touchy though. One of my neighbours has a brilliant electrically controlled unit hooked up to cameras and a computer, absolutely fantastic.

I remember once my uncle coming up from Sydney and staying for a few nights said he couldn't get over the amount of stars he could see, said you don't see that in western Sydney at night.
When Halley's Comet visited us many years ago I was living in Sydney, took some relos down to the ocean cliffs halfway between Sydney and Woolongong one moonless night with no city lights to impede our view, bloody fantastic. The constellations you see as you get further into the outback is just astounding, it does not take much background light to make half the sky invisible.
 

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Triton n Lovin it.
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I love being out west on a clear night and just looking at the stars. :)

When Halley's Comet was going over, I was doing an overnighter to Mackay in a truck. Out on the stretch between Rocky and Mackay, I could see it real clear as it was scooting along. 8)

Foo
 

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The Googlest, Apparently!
nissan patrol
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I have an app on phone/iPad that allows you to point it at sky in any direction and screen moves around and shows you the names of the naked eye viewable stars, constellations and planets live as you're looking.

Fascinating, love it, sometimes lie on the back lawn when there's a new moon and try to learn some of the brighter objects.

I have the app as well, and can hook it up to my telescope. Great stuff.


Actually at the moment all 5 naked eye planets are visible pre dawn
Been watching that, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn with the moon transcribing them and reaches its full display on a few days. But it started on the 27th.
 

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The Googlest, Apparently!
nissan patrol
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I was in Victoria near Tidal River surfing in 86 when Halley came by, did not think it was much compared to the hype build up and what had been seen on previous visits. Still spectacular though.

Comet Lovejoy in 2011 was much better. Went down and camped on a beach east of Augusta to get rid of ambient light. Outstanding stuff.
 

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Put some pics up. I have a 150x750, not an expensive one but I can see the rings of Saturn and the storms of Jupiter when the time is right and I put my mind to it, bloody touchy though. One of my neighbours has a brilliant electrically controlled unit hooked up to cameras and a computer, absolutely fantastic.
Your 150x750 scope is a good thing for seeing almost anything you want, and it's reasonably compact so you won't need to take up the entire back of your Patrol with equipment, like I used to do...
I began my stargazing with binoculars, then graduated to larger and more elaborate telescopes on motorized mounts, then cameras and computers running off a 100AH SLA battery.
It all got too expensive after a while, and these days I follow the ISS and bright objects using binoculars. Yep I've gone back to basics!
 

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GUII ZD30DI Wgn
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Discussion Starter #20
Not sure what Leethal has but a good one is Night Sky
My neighbour has had that for some time, works bloody brilliant, about the only reason I'd ever want to own a "smart" phone :).
 
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