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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So another post got me thinking about the difficulty of explaining how to do a quality electrical wiring joint without pictures.

Which leads us here...

I thought a good example would be splicing a wire into another in line without degrading the initial connection.

It is one of the more difficult joins to do but will explain a few of the techniques for good electrical connection.

[EDIT - Looks like I have no idea how to put attached pictures where I want them. At least they are all there]

The Tools
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243634&stc=1&d=1432259299
Wire Strippers, Knife (rusty, I know, it sits in my fishing kit), Soldering Iron, Solder, Tape, Heat Shrink, Ruler (for the perfectionists out there)

Preparation
Turn on your Soldering Iron :D
Strip the wire to be spliced in at a reasonable length to allow you to work with it easily. For this (14AWG) I did about 5cm.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243642&stc=1&d=1432259609
I also used the wire strippers to start the cut for the existing cable then scored the mid section on either side of the piece to be removed and split and peeled it off.
A bit of a twist on the existing cable to splay out the conductors.
Feed a 5cm length of heatshrink onto the new cable then split the conductors into 3 Sections. This is easier if you leave the middle 1/3 of conductors straight and split the outer conductors to either side.
Feed the middle 1/3 through the existing cable like:
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243650&stc=1&d=1432260029
Fold the Middle 1/3 back up towards the new cable (try to keep the sheath of the new cable about 5mm from the existing cable, I pulled mine a bit tight doing this one as you'll see later)
Split the outer 2/3 around either side of the existing cable.
Then wrap the outer groups along the existing cable in opposite directions.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243658&stc=1&d=1432260599

http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243666&stc=1&d=1432260745

Wrap the Middle 1/3 tightly up the new cable working away from the existing cable, back towards it's own sheath and it's ready to solder.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243674&stc=1&d=1432260946

Soldering
Pre heat the work. Unless the wires are hot the solder will not penetrate to the centre of the join resulting in a less effective connection. A little solder on the tip of the iron will help to conduct the heat to the join.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243706&stc=1&d=1432261248

Once the join has heated up enough you can begin to add solder. Be sure to solder the Wire not the Soldering Iron!
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243714&stc=1&d=1432261429

Work your way along the ends of the join ensuring that the entire centre of it is flooded with solder.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243722&stc=1&d=1432261554
Once you have soldered all the way to the ends of the conductors (encapsulating the ends of the strands ensures that the entire cross sectional area is electrically conductive not just the outside of the strands) Let the work cool, then you're ready for

Insulation
Note that the solder has worked its way between the strands not just the outside.
Start by wrapping the width of your electrical insulating tape around the new cables sheath
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243730&stc=1&d=1432261982

(Continued):roll:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Part II

Hmm well looks like the attachment thing didn't exactly work as planned :headwall:

Anyway as I was saying:

Work your way down to the join and along the existing cable keeping the electrical tape tight (a slight stretch should happen as you work along) until you have wrapped the width of the tape over the insulation.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243738&stc=1&d=1432262417

Now work back along the existing cable right to the other end maintaining 50% overlay
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243746&stc=1&d=1432262508

Finally make your way back to the centre of the join, then up the new cable to where you started, cut the tape and wrap the tag around.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243754&stc=1&d=1432262596
Leading us to:

Heat Shrink
Slide the Heat shrink down over the tape to the join and shrink it on down. I usually use a heat gun for this but I couldn't find it so I just used a lighter. A soldering iron can be held next to it to shink it too but it is slow and you have to be careful not to touch the iron to it.
http://www.patrol4x4.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=243762&stc=1&d=1432262834
The heat shrink ensures your tape cannot unravel!

Anyway I hope this helps at least one person out there :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So can anyone advise me how to get the pictures to attach in the correct place?

I was uploading then dragging from attached list into the post where appropriate but it seems that only drops a link and the actual object appears at the bottom.

There has to be a better way :anger:

Scottie
 

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nissan
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So can anyone advise me how to get the pictures to attach in the correct place?

I was uploading then dragging from attached list into the post where appropriate but it seems that only drops a link and the actual object appears at the bottom.

There has to be a better way :anger:

Scottie
Great how to. Thanks.

I to would like to know how to put pics in specific places.
Cheers.:)
 

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A little soldering tip :)
Most off us has probably found those ugly looking cabels that the copper has turned black in,
and not possible to solder, buy some wheel cleaner that contains a little acid ( a lot of them has that) pour some wheel cleaner in a little cup, put the wire end in and leave it overnight, next day you will have nice clean copper ends that solder great :)

Did this on the cables that was broken off to the tank metering unit, works great :)

/Spawn
 

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Good tips.

I have never done the connection with the wire at right angles - it will make the join more noticable. I strip the wire, twist the two wires together, and solder. Then I run heat shrink over and seal. If i cannot use the heat sink, i tape. if the wire is exposed to water I tape first then seal with amalginating tape.

Make sure you use Tinned flux solder - not the solder and flux that plumbers use (their flux is acid base and will corroed you connection.)

Spawn32's tip is good, but make sure you nutilise the wheel cleaner, as it will corroed you connection - ie cause the copper turning black over time.

Gu Scottie - clean your soldering iron tip and tin prior to soldering as it will help the solder to run. (If you look at your photo the trip of you iron is blackish). A quick wipe on a piece of cotten (dont burn your self) or on a wet sponge. Also to assist in the flow of solder put a little bit of solder on the irons tip prior to soldering.
 

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Make sure you use Tinned flux solder - not the solder and flux that plumbers use (their flux is acid base and will corroed you connection.)
Another soldering tip.

If you do use plumbers type flux or if you use resin core solder and the flux has run down on to the contact area of a terminal, like an Anderson plug terminal, you can use turps to remove all forms of flux and turps will no effect the copper, there terminal surface or the plastic insulation.
 

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that is pretty crappy way to join wires
seriously u r over complicating it
just twist the wire 2 to 3 times around the longer wire u r trying to splice then solder it

I neve ever have a wire soldered at perpendicular to another wire
its bloody ugly and once u tape it up its even more ugly

90% of people cant solder properly or neatly

also if u want to splice a wire to another wire u don't always have to solder
buy some non insulated terminals like the narva ones
cut the rear section off and the front section off
all u have now is a very small u shaped piece
use that and crimp it on rather than soldering

I cannot stand people who solder at 90 degrees to another wire
always run the wire u have joined along the wire u just spliced
makes it easier to tape up

also use good tape
not the cheap supercheap plastic tape
 

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also use solder from jaycar
not automotive solder

they have had to remove some lead or all lead from proper automotive solder
because of the greenies
this means u need a lot more heat to melt it

jaycar solder is nice and easy to work with
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The above is a technique used for in line splicing in industrial environments. The wrap through the existing cable ensures that vibration cannot crack the solder and unravel the twist.

It is an exercise in demonstrating the techniques used in soldering to help those who have not soldered or seen soldering done before.

As you say I usually would do single cable to single cable by twisting but once again when I do that I split the conductors into 2 groups.

One of which is wrapped straight along the other cable as you said, but the other halves are looped back through each other 180 degreees and wrapped back along the joint the opposite direction to form a mechanical lock that cannot be vibrated apart.

bobby4wd you are more than welcome to chime in and show how you would do it and maybe you can teach someone something.
 

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I recon there would be more vibration issues with wire at 90 degrees

I always run wire parallel and tape or support it to the orig wire
Now I know why 90% of 4wds have bloody ugliest engine bays with a million wires
Coming of the battery positive hehehe

Most of automotive wire is thin and if u start wrapping different strands around another thinner wire which has been pulled apart so u can run more strands thru is easily going to break

Anyway the best way is to go buy the proper splicing crimps
But hey this is the forums so I doubt anyone would use them
 

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Anyway the best way is to go buy the proper splicing crimps
But hey this is the forums so I doubt anyone would use them
people won't know if they don't see....

throw up images of splicing crimps or how you do yours... people then have a better start point to make decisions....
 

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I think I'd rather solder my joins any day thanks. For an end terminal yeah ok use a crimp on fitting, but if I need I can easily get access to the end to replace as required. I don't want to have to get under the dash or pull interior out again once I join a wire. I prefer the method of keeping the wires inline soldering and then heat shrink over the junction.
 

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The crimps ok- as long as they are done with the correct crimper.

Never use the scotch loch insulation wire jOINER, they cause heaps of problem. In the days of car phones we mad a mint fixing faulty installation - by replacing the scotch locks with soldered connections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nismo26,

Agreed. TYCO make a lot of very good gear. I use a lot of their stuff at work.

I am not much of a fan of crimp type connectors in cars. When I do use them I solder the end of the stands into the body of the crimp.

They're ok if it is signal level type stuff but for anything that carries current I prefer to solder (even my speaker terminals are soldered - full transmission and no rattling off ever)

Scotchlock and other IDC (Insulation Displacement Connectors) should be avoided for multicore cables because they can cut the conductors and come off if subjected to tension.

The following comes from a TYCO Flow Control Technical Manual regarding equipment connection:

" Solid core cables should be installed in connectors using “insulation
displacement” connection; this ensures minimal resistance, reliability and an
air tight seal.

Multi-core conductors should use screwed type termination connectors.
Cables need to be stripped before fitting to connectors; ideally a correctly
crimped bootlace ferrule should be used on each conductor. Multi-core
conductors are not suitable for use with insulation displacement connectors."

Bootlace Ferrules are just like they sound, they look like the end of shoelaces before crimping. After crimping they will have 3 flat sides and one side with ridges across it to stop them sliding out under tension. Theres a few of them in this picture (on the end of every control wire)
 

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