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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Team. I'm chasing up some ideas for rear recovery points. I am seeking the experience and knowledge of the members here to work through the pros and cons of having no tow bar.
Currently my GU doesn't have a tow bar. I won't be towing, ever. To save on the expense of buying and fitting a tow bar I'm considering fitting some front recovery points to the rear and running a bridle for recoveries.
The pros would be weight savings and potentially departure angles.
A con would obviously be no ability to tow, which is not necessarily a con for me.

I ask if anyone has or is currently rolling wothout a tow bar please let me know your thoughts or experiences. This includes any ideas on those recovery points mentioned above.

Cheers

P.s. I'm not a weight weenie nor do i think they patrol is by any means a light vehicle. I do however have a philosophy of lightening as much as possible without compromising safety or utility.
I welcome your thoughts!!

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'14 Y61 ZD30 CRD M/T ST
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Hi Team. I'm chasing up some ideas for rear recovery points. I am seeking the experience and knowledge of the members here to work through the pros and cons of having no tow bar.
Currently my GU doesn't have a tow bar. I won't be towing, ever. To save on the expense of buying and fitting a tow bar I'm considering fitting some front recovery points to the rear and running a bridle for recoveries.
The pros would be weight savings and potentially departure angles.
A con would obviously be no ability to tow, which is not necessarily a con for me.

I ask if anyone has or is currently rolling wothout a tow bar please let me know your thoughts or experiences. This includes any ideas on those recovery points mentioned above.

Cheers

P.s. I'm not a weight weenie nor do i think they patrol is by any means a light vehicle. I do however have a philosophy of lightening as much as possible without compromising safety or utility.
I welcome your thoughts!!

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk
I can't see anything wrong with what you want to do. Makes perfect sense to me however, my 2cw:

- GU's don't have a huge payload and a towbar is heavy. Every kg you could save would be worth it.

- The best attachment points to use, would be the towbar ones, but you won't find any "front recovery ponts" that would be (Michael) Bolt-on, ;) so you'd probably have to have some custom made, which could cost as much as a towbar if you can't DIY. I would not recommend drilling holes in the frame to bolt your own recovery points to. Best to use existing holes with weld nuts (the M12's) in the frame.

- Assuming we're talking Wagon here, a GU has a pretty good departure angle and a towbar (the Genuine one anyway) doesn't have a huge impact on it.

So if you're hell bent on saving a few kg's (which is not a bad thing at all) having a set of recovery points made is a good option, but the easiest option would be to fit a towbar and shove a recovery hitch in it.

I have a genuine towbar and don't own anything to tow. I have a $30 Aldi recovery hitch permanently fitted in my towbar.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks @AndrieK.
I've picked up a towbar for cheap so I have that sitting there but I'll look into recovery points I think.
The tow bar assembly weighs a little bit so I'll see how it goes.

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the easiest option would be to fit a towbar and shove a recovery hitch in it.
What's wrong with an ordinary tow hitch that has the tow ball removed? Are you concerned that it isn't designed for snatching from while a recovery hitch is? If that's the case then the tow bar is not designed for snatching from either. The tow bar and tow hitch both have exactly the same rating which is for towing 3.5 tonnes. Is there any evidence that the hitch will fail before the towbar? I'm not trying to be a smart arse here, just wondering why people have such faith in using the towbar for a type of load that it wasn't designed for, but won't use an equivalently rated tow hitch for the same purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@Overboard thanks for the reply. Nothing smart arse about what you said. So all good there.
I wholy agree that the tow bar is proably the simplest and most tested means for a rear recovery point. No argument there. I have bought one and will likely use it.
I guess my reason for this thread was just to have a think, a discussion if its necessary. If there are other options etc. Curiosity more than anything. We snatch off recovery points on the front so i had a thought it could be done from the rear too.


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What's wrong with an ordinary tow hitch that has the tow ball removed? Are you concerned that it isn't designed for snatching from while a recovery hitch is? If that's the case then the tow bar is not designed for snatching from either. The tow bar and tow hitch both have exactly the same rating which is for towing 3.5 tonnes. Is there any evidence that the hitch will fail before the towbar? I'm not trying to be a smart arse here, just wondering why people have such faith in using the towbar for a type of load that it wasn't designed for, but won't use an equivalently rated tow hitch for the same purpose.
Absolutely nothing wrong with your thinking but a little impractical imo for most drivers.

My towball is permanently bolted to my tow hitch. I don't intend removing at at any time and I don't see why anyone would want to while out and about. It needs a rather large socket / spanner to fit or remove (and should ideally be torqued) and these tend to be quite heavy. So if you're on your big lap and operating close to your GVM, every kg counts.

I don't really see how removing the towball from the hitch first would be something I could be bothered with, prior to attempting a recovery, so shoving a recovery hitch in the bar and simply attaching the J-Pin seems like a lot less hassle to me.

And you and I both know what's going to happen when some idiot decides it's too hard to remove the ball... He's simply going to throw the strap over the ball with well documented deadly catastrophic results.

If the weight or the cost of the $30 hitch is a concern, rather than removing the ball from the hitch, just feed the recovery strap into the towbar reciever and recover straight off the J-Pin. That's probably the cheapest lightest quickest and easiest solution of them all and is as safe as any other recommended method.

Just on the hitch itself, in principle I don't think there's any issue with using it for recovery however, most often the hitch has some form of welding on it and if it's going to fail, it'll quite often happen at or near the weld. Using a recovery hitch eliminates one more failure mode as there is no weld.

The thing I like about using the towbar, is that it spreads the load across the two frame rails. I don't like recovering off a single point which is why I have two front recovery points and use the towbar at the back.
 
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